2018
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-24407-x
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Abstract: We evaluated the presence of coronaviruses by PCR in 918 Australian wild bird samples collected during 2016–17. Coronaviruses were detected in 141 samples (15.3%) from species of ducks, shorebirds and herons and from multiple sampling locations. Sequencing of selected positive samples found mainly gammacoronaviruses, but also some deltacoronaviruses. The detection rate of coronaviruses was improved by using multiple PCR assays, as no single assay could detect all coronavirus positive samples. Sequencing of the… Show more

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Cited by 40 publications
(72 citation statements)
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References 37 publications
(72 reference statements)
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“…This may be due to the physiological differences noted above or, more simply, that the ducks and wader viruses were sampled at different times and places. Despite the lack of connectivity between the Anseriformes and Charadriiformes at a viral species level, avian avulavirus 1 and deltacoronavirus detected in Rednecked Stint and Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, respectively, have been previously described in Anseriformes [13,52], likely facilitated by the association of these birds to water. Specifically, viruses such as IAV are thought to be primarily transmitted by the faecal-oral route, in which viruses contaminate water through the faeces and birds ingest the viruses while feeding or preening [18].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 91%
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“…This may be due to the physiological differences noted above or, more simply, that the ducks and wader viruses were sampled at different times and places. Despite the lack of connectivity between the Anseriformes and Charadriiformes at a viral species level, avian avulavirus 1 and deltacoronavirus detected in Rednecked Stint and Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, respectively, have been previously described in Anseriformes [13,52], likely facilitated by the association of these birds to water. Specifically, viruses such as IAV are thought to be primarily transmitted by the faecal-oral route, in which viruses contaminate water through the faeces and birds ingest the viruses while feeding or preening [18].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 91%
“…We identified 27 novel and previously described viral species from nine waterbirds falling into two avian orders. Anseriformes and Charadriiformes are important reservoirs for the best described avian virus, IAV, but are also central to the epidemiology of other multi-host viruses such as avian coronavirus and avian avulavirus type 1 [13,14,27,[50][51][52][53][54]. As such, these avian hosts are excellent model species for understanding the determinants of virome composition.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, at the level of viral species there was no connectivity between the Anseriform and Charadriiform libraries, although this may be due to the physiological differences noted above or, more simply, that the ducks and wader viruses were sampled at different times and places. Despite the lack of connectivity between the Anseriformes and Charadriiformes at a viral species level, avian avulavirus 1 and deltacoronavirus detected in Red-necked Stint and Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, respectively, have been previously described in Anseriformes (10,51). This connectivity between viromes is likely facilitated by the association of these birds to water.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Anasplatyrhynchos, swan goose; Ansercygnoidesdomesticus, shelduck; Tadornacana) and we found limited amino acids conservation in comparison to human counterpart (Table 2). Moreover, there is no experimental proof for betacoronavirus (like SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) infection in the birds; although a recent study has shown the significant presence of alpha and gammacoronaviruses in ducks, shorebirds, and herons in Australia (Chamings et al 2018). These observations allow us to believe that the birds are less prone to betacoronavirus infection or the least chance of bird infection from betacoronaviruses.…”
Section: Reservoir For Sars-cov-2mentioning
confidence: 98%