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Cited by 13 publications
(10 citation statements)
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References 9 publications
(10 reference statements)
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“…Thus the increase in concentration creates a diffusive flow, reducing the permeate flow and increasing the osmotic pressure of the solution (Chacón-Villalobos, 2005;Habert et al, 2006). This phenomenon known as concentration by polarization is directly related to standard and complete pore blocking, confirming the present results (Mello et al, 2010). In addition, Salgado et al (2013) reported that the pore blocking mechanisms are the first to appear, followed by the formation of a filter cake layer.…”
Section: Flow Decline Modellingsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Thus the increase in concentration creates a diffusive flow, reducing the permeate flow and increasing the osmotic pressure of the solution (Chacón-Villalobos, 2005;Habert et al, 2006). This phenomenon known as concentration by polarization is directly related to standard and complete pore blocking, confirming the present results (Mello et al, 2010). In addition, Salgado et al (2013) reported that the pore blocking mechanisms are the first to appear, followed by the formation of a filter cake layer.…”
Section: Flow Decline Modellingsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…This indicates that the major fraction of flavonoid constituents in the raw green propolis is predominantly non-polar, mainly polyphenols with low molecular weights such as pinobanksin, kaempferol, apigenin, pinocembrin, chrysin and galangin (Hayacibara et al, 2005). Such solvent polarity dependence has been confirmed by analysis, as performed by Mello et al (2010) who reported that the solubility of flavonoids presented in raw propolis is estimated to be approximately three times greater in ethanol than the fraction soluble in water.…”
Section: Phenolics and Flavonoids Content In Propolis Extractsmentioning
confidence: 68%
“…To the aqueous extracts, exposure to different temperature times caused no significant difference in the amount of extracted compounds, however the extract obtained from infusion had a greater abundance of flavonoids as compared to the decoction. Studies show that can occur degradation of flavonoids with temperature rise, however, this process also depends on the chemical structure and the interaction between them (Baby et al, 2007, Mello et al, 2010). In this sense, the decoction longer exposure to elevated temperature may have been the cause of the reduction of the level of flavonoids.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%