Psychiatric Disorders - Trends and Developments 2011
DOI: 10.5772/25741
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Depression During Pregnancy: Review of Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects in Developed and Developing Countries

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Cited by 5 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…Primary Care Prevention and Health Promotion Research Network (RedIAPP), Valladolid, Spain. 2 International School of Doctorate Studies, National University of Distance Education (UNED), Madrid, Spain. 3 Department of Personality Psychology, National University of Distance Education (UNED), Madrid, Spain.…”
Section: Acknowledgementsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Primary Care Prevention and Health Promotion Research Network (RedIAPP), Valladolid, Spain. 2 International School of Doctorate Studies, National University of Distance Education (UNED), Madrid, Spain. 3 Department of Personality Psychology, National University of Distance Education (UNED), Madrid, Spain.…”
Section: Acknowledgementsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Perinatal depression (PD), which includes major and minor depressive episodes that occur during pregnancy and/or in the first 12 months after delivery, is one of the most common conditions that can develop during pregnancy and the postpartum period [1]. The prevalence of PD in developing countries is approximately 20%; in developed countries, it is in the range of 10%-15% [2]. Untreated PD can have devastating effects on women, infants, and their families [3][4][5], so much so that NICE guidelines in the UK recommend screening for PD in primary care (PC) settings [6].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Perinatal depression is a common kind of nonpsychotic depression that affects women from conception until after birth and may have devastating implications (2,3). Prenatal depression seems to be more prevalent in nations with lower incomes (7%-15%) than in countries with higher incomes (19%-25% vs. 7%-15%) (4,5). Anxiety and mood swings are also prevalent during pregnancy because of the hormonal changes and other physical shifts that occur during the pregnancy (6).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%