1979
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.115.1.36
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Delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity and lymphocyte transformation: dissociation in atopic dermatitis

Abstract: Studies of cell mediated immunity (CMI) in atopic dermatitis have demonstrated various defects and frequently contradictory results. The true nature of immune dysfunction remains uncertain. We approached this question by concurrently examining two aspects of CMI: delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity and in vitro lymphocyte transformation. Responses were tested using the antigens Candida albicans and streptokinase-streptodornase (SKSD). Mean lymphocyte transformation was equal in atopic patients and controls, alt… Show more

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Cited by 28 publications
(10 citation statements)
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“…When comparing patients with atopic eczema to those without atopic eczema, there was no significant difference between the groups except for nickel and fragrance mix I, where there was decreased sensitization in those with atopic eczema (current or history). Atopy is characterized by a tendency to develop immunoglobulin E (IgE) type I antibodies and may be associated with decreased ability to produce the type IV delayed immune response (25); in theory this should render them tolerant to contact allergens. In the 1980s and early 1990s, studies reported that atopic patients with dermatitis were less frequently sensitized than non-atopic patients (26).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…When comparing patients with atopic eczema to those without atopic eczema, there was no significant difference between the groups except for nickel and fragrance mix I, where there was decreased sensitization in those with atopic eczema (current or history). Atopy is characterized by a tendency to develop immunoglobulin E (IgE) type I antibodies and may be associated with decreased ability to produce the type IV delayed immune response (25); in theory this should render them tolerant to contact allergens. In the 1980s and early 1990s, studies reported that atopic patients with dermatitis were less frequently sensitized than non-atopic patients (26).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Some authors sustained that the delayed-type hypersensitivity was impaired in AD [17], but it is believed now that AD patients can become sensitized to contact haptens [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24], and it has been observed that the capability of contact sensitization in AD is inversely related to the severity of the disease [18, 24, 25]. Because AD patients have a drier and more irritable skin than normal subjects, it has been demonstrated that the contact with irritants enhances its allergic contact reactivity [26].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Molluscum contagio-.sum, and rarely Vaccinia [24,25], decreased ability to be sensitized to Rhus (poison ivy) and dinitrochlorobenzene [26], decreased lymphocyte response to mitogens. recall antigens, and allo-antigens in vitro [27,28], defective generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in vitro [29]. and decreased phagocytic capacity and chemotaxis of neutrophils and monocytes [30].…”
Section: Tmmunopathologymentioning
confidence: 99%