1999
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-1013111 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Although uncommon, ischemia of the gastric fundus can lead to catastrophic anastomotic complications after transhiatal esophagectomy. "Delaying" the anastomosis may prevent complications in occasional patients with particularly compromised gastric fundal perfusion.

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“…(2) bone and cartilage defects of the ribs, clavicle, and sternum; (3) Sprengel deformity; (4) scoliosis; (5) lung herniation; (6) dextrocardia; or (7) absence or underdevelopment of the breast or areola (Figure 1). 6,9,15,16,19,23,29,33,43,[45][46][47] The most common hand anomaly is partial or complete symbrachydactyly (absence of middle phalanges), but abnormalities may range from simple syndactyly to complete ectrodactyly (absence of digits) in severely affected patients 8,23,41 (Figures 2 and 3). In addition, absence or hypoplasia of carpal bones or metacarpals; absence or attenuation of flexor or extensor tendons; shortening of the humerus, radius or ulna; constriction bands; polydactyly; and nail agenesis have been described.…”
Section: Clinical Presentationmentioning
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rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…(2) bone and cartilage defects of the ribs, clavicle, and sternum; (3) Sprengel deformity; (4) scoliosis; (5) lung herniation; (6) dextrocardia; or (7) absence or underdevelopment of the breast or areola (Figure 1). 6,9,15,16,19,23,29,33,43,[45][46][47] The most common hand anomaly is partial or complete symbrachydactyly (absence of middle phalanges), but abnormalities may range from simple syndactyly to complete ectrodactyly (absence of digits) in severely affected patients 8,23,41 (Figures 2 and 3). In addition, absence or hypoplasia of carpal bones or metacarpals; absence or attenuation of flexor or extensor tendons; shortening of the humerus, radius or ulna; constriction bands; polydactyly; and nail agenesis have been described.…”
Section: Clinical Presentationmentioning
“…It is important to evaluate the condition of the latissimus dorsi prior to any reconstructive procedure, as this is the most commonly used flap, due to its regional locale. 7,29,45 In addition, preoperative angiography and chest computed tomography (CT) scan should be considered to evaluate the blood supply of potential flaps and thoroughly understand the extent of the anomaly. 4,7,16 Surgical reconstruction for children is often performed in 2 stages and 1 stage for adults.…”
Section: Treatmentmentioning
“…In general, it is characterized by the absence of the pectoralis major muscle. Symbracydactyla, hand / forearm hypoplasia / agenesis, and Sprengel deformity and thumb agenesis may be associated with this syndrome 6,7 .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning