2009
DOI: 10.2202/1540-8884.1319 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: This article analyzes survey data that establishes a connection between how ordinary citizens conceive of American identity and their preferences for immigration policy. The distinction between ethnocultural and liberal images of America matters for public preferences about how many and what kind of immigrants should enter the United States.

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“…Students who had a stronger belief in what could be considered the ethos of the "American dream," which could be operationalized as a proxy for students' American identity, were significantly less likely to support educational access for undocumented immigrants. This finding supports previous research indicating that individuals with a stronger American identity or ethnocentric values often see immigrants as a threat to the economic, cultural, and sociopolitical fabric of the United States (Citrin & Wright, 2009;E. O. Perez, 2010).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…Students who had a stronger belief in what could be considered the ethos of the "American dream," which could be operationalized as a proxy for students' American identity, were significantly less likely to support educational access for undocumented immigrants. This finding supports previous research indicating that individuals with a stronger American identity or ethnocentric values often see immigrants as a threat to the economic, cultural, and sociopolitical fabric of the United States (Citrin & Wright, 2009;E. O. Perez, 2010).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…Similarly, E. O. Perez (2010) found that people with ethnocentric values are more opposed to both legal and illegal immigration; and Citrin and Wright (2009) concluded that a strong American identity influences a preference for immigration restriction. Overall, race and ethnicity are important characteristics that predict attitudes toward immigration but their effects may be altered by contextual factors and views on race, group identity, and multiculturalism.…”
mentioning
“…A considerable body of work locates an association between 'ethnic' or exclusive definitions of the nation and opposition to immigration (Citrin et al, 1990;Coenders 2001;Citrin et al, 2001;Heath and Tilley 2005;Citrin and Wright 2009;Pehrsson 2009;Wong 2010;Schildkraut 2014). A smaller number of studies seek to establish causal links between national identity and attitudes to immigration using survey experiments which prime national identity.…”
Section: National Identity and Immigration Policy Preferencesmentioning
“…Perceived threats to a country's distinctive identity and culture drive antiimmigrant sentiment in the U.S. and elsewhere (Citrin et al 1990;Hainmueller & Hangartner 2013;Schildkraut 2011;Sniderman & Hagendoorn 2007;Theiss-Morse 2010;Wong 2010;Wright, Citrin & Wand 2012). Americans almost universally endorse acculturation as a prerequisite to full-fledged membership in the national community -speaking English, holding American values, feeling American, and getting ahead on one's own (Citrin & Wright 2009;Schildkraut 2011). Accordingly, studies show hostility to immigrants who speak poor English (Newman, Hartman, & Taber 2012) and support for using English ability and gainful employment as criteria for legal admission .…”
Section: Attribute-based Judgmentmentioning