2015
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100861
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Abstract: Given the dramatic increase in ageing populations, it is of great importance to understand the genetic and molecular determinants of healthy ageing and longevity. Semi-supercentenarians (subjects who reached an age of 105-109 years) arguably represent the gold standard of successful human ageing because they managed to avoid or postpone the onset of major age-related diseases. Relatively few studies have looked at epigenetic determinants of extreme longevity in humans. Here we test whether families with extrem… Show more

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Cited by 254 publications
(202 citation statements)
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References 83 publications
(73 reference statements)
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“…These changes start during embryogenesis and continue throughout the lifespan, affecting chromatin states, lineage specialization, gene expression, genome stability and self-renewal of stem cells (Beerman and Rossi, 2014; Benayoun et al, 2015; Consortium et al, 2015; Guo et al, 2014; Stelzer et al, 2015; Sun et al, 2014; Taiwo et al, 2013). The human DNAm clock model can predict certain health outcomes, such as increased future mortality (Chen et al, 2016; Christiansen et al, 2016; Horvath et al, 2015a; Marioni et al, 2015). In addition, accelerated DNAm aging was observed in patients with HIV infection and Down syndrome, and slower DNAm changes were reported for cerebellum aging (Horvath and Levine, 2015; Horvath et al, 2015b, 2015c).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These changes start during embryogenesis and continue throughout the lifespan, affecting chromatin states, lineage specialization, gene expression, genome stability and self-renewal of stem cells (Beerman and Rossi, 2014; Benayoun et al, 2015; Consortium et al, 2015; Guo et al, 2014; Stelzer et al, 2015; Sun et al, 2014; Taiwo et al, 2013). The human DNAm clock model can predict certain health outcomes, such as increased future mortality (Chen et al, 2016; Christiansen et al, 2016; Horvath et al, 2015a; Marioni et al, 2015). In addition, accelerated DNAm aging was observed in patients with HIV infection and Down syndrome, and slower DNAm changes were reported for cerebellum aging (Horvath and Levine, 2015; Horvath et al, 2015b, 2015c).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recent studies demonstrate that DNAm age is at least a passive biomarker of biological age: the epigenetic age of blood has been found to be predictive of all-cause mortality [59], frailty [10], cognitive and physical functioning [5]. Further, the utility of the epigenetic clock method using various tissues and organs has been demonstrated in applications surrounding Alzheimer disease [11], centenarian status [8], pre-natal and early life influences [12], Down syndrome [13], HIV infection [14], Huntington disease [15], obesity [16], lifetime stress [17], menopause [18], and Parkinson disease [19]. Departures of methylation-estimated age from chronological age can be used to define intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration (IEAA) that measures cell-intrinsic ageing effects that are independent of chronological age and blood cell composition.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The epigenetic clock is thought to capture aspects of biological age, supported by data demonstrating that the older epigenetic age of blood is predictive of all-cause mortality(31;32), younger epigenetic age relates to cognitive and physical fitness in the elderly(33), and epigenetic age is younger in the offspring of Italian semi-supercentenarians (i.e. subjects aged 105 or older) compared to age-matched controls(34). The epigenetic clock method has been used in applications surrounding obesity(29), Down syndrome(35), HIV infection(36), Parkinson’s disease(37), Alzheimer’s disease related neuropathologies(38), and lung cancer(39).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%