2019
DOI: 10.1177/0885328219863115 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Although significant progress has been made, delayed neovascularisation of tissue-engineered constructs still remains challenging for the survival of constructs post-grafting. The addition of laboratory expanded proangiogenic cells to tissue engineering scaffold systems prior to implantation is a promising approach to overcome the slow neovascularisation. The use of decellularised biological constructs is an emerging strategy for producing physiologically relevant scaffolds for use in both pre-clinical and cli… Show more

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“…In fact, in addition to their readily availability, low cost, ease of use, and absence of ethical issues, plant tissues exhibit good cytocompatibility (Modulevsky et al, 2014) and biocompatibility (Modulevsky et al, 2016). For instance, 2D scaffolds were obtained after decellularization of leaves [e.g., Artemisia annua, (Gershlak et al, 2017) Anthurium, (Fontana et al, 2017) Ficus hispida, (Adamski et al, 2018) spinach leaves] (Gershlak et al, 2017;Dikici et al, 2019) by preserving their branched vessels, resembling mammalian vasculature. On decellularized spinach leaves, (Gershlak et al, 2017) a contractile function and calcium handling capabilities were observed after 21 days of cardiomyocytes culture, confirming the suitability of the scaffold for in vitro cardiac tissue regeneration.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
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“…In fact, in addition to their readily availability, low cost, ease of use, and absence of ethical issues, plant tissues exhibit good cytocompatibility (Modulevsky et al, 2014) and biocompatibility (Modulevsky et al, 2016). For instance, 2D scaffolds were obtained after decellularization of leaves [e.g., Artemisia annua, (Gershlak et al, 2017) Anthurium, (Fontana et al, 2017) Ficus hispida, (Adamski et al, 2018) spinach leaves] (Gershlak et al, 2017;Dikici et al, 2019) by preserving their branched vessels, resembling mammalian vasculature. On decellularized spinach leaves, (Gershlak et al, 2017) a contractile function and calcium handling capabilities were observed after 21 days of cardiomyocytes culture, confirming the suitability of the scaffold for in vitro cardiac tissue regeneration.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…The spinach leaves have been decellularized following standard serial chemical treatment (Fontana et al, 2017;Gershlak et al, 2017;Dikici et al, 2019). After 7 days of treatment, leaves lost chlorophyll and appeared fully translucent (Supplementary Figure S1A) suggesting that plant material have been successfully removed from the native structure.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
“…More recently, a study showed the great potential of decellularized spinach leaves to model the cardiac environment by recellularizing both the inner vascular network of the plant with human endothelial cells and the surface of the leaf with cardiomyocytes showing that a multitude of plant-derived cellulose scaffolds are suitable in vitro (Gershlak et al, 2017). Many different cell types have been used to repopulate decellularized plant-derived scaffolds, including human endothelial cells (Gershlak et al, 2017;Dikici et al, 2019), human dermal fibroblasts (Fontana et al, 2017;Dikici et al, 2019), mouse fibroblasts (Modulevsky et al, 2014;James et al, 2020), mouse myoblasts (Modulevsky et al, 2014), human cervical cell lines (Modulevsky et al, 2014), human aortic smooth muscle cells (James et al, 2020), mesenchymal stem cells (Fontana et al, 2017;Gershlak et al, 2017;James et al, 2020) and stem cells derived cardiomyocytes (Gershlak et al, 2017), suggesting that cellulose scaffolds can attach either cell lines or primary cells.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Furthermore, nanofibres made of PHBV have previously been shown to be a suitable environment for ECs to form an endothelial monolayer (Dew et al, 2016). Although nanofibres are favorable for the formation of the endothelium layer, these close-packed fibers act as a barrier to cell infiltration (Aldemir Dikici et al, 2019a).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Air Plasma Treatment to Improve Cell Attachment After fabrication of the inner and outer tubes, both tubes were treated with air plasma (Diener Electronic, Ebhausen, Germany) with a power of 50 W and a pressure of 0.8 mbar for 60 s to improve cell attachment to the hydrophobic surfaces as demonstrated in our previous work ( Figure 1D) (Aldemir Dikici et al, 2019a).…”
Section: Manufacturing Of the Inner Tube By Electrospinningmentioning