2022
DOI: 10.1177/00420980211067906
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Abstract: In this commentary, we argue that augmented concepts and research methods are needed to comprehend hybrid urban governance reconfigurations that benefit market actors but eschew competition in favour of deal-making between elite state and private actors. Fuelled by financialisation and in response to planning conflict are regulatory reforms that legitimise opaque alliances in service of infrastructure and urban development projects. From a specific city (Sydney, Australia) we draw upon one such reform – Unsoli… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 64 publications
(125 reference statements)
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“…The usefulness of this notion as both concept and method invites a parallel focus on ‘seeing like a corporation’. Together they forge a significant hybrid field, one marked by high-level coordination between ‘narrow constellation’ of powers ‘at the intersection of neoliberalism and Asia-Pacific state-capitalism’ (Gibson et al, 2022: 1). What these authors call a new public–private hybridisation ‘exerts a force’ which is sociologically observable in ‘the way it attracts people, draws them in, coalesces and expends their capacities’ (Simone, 2013: 243).…”
Section: Questions Contexts and Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The usefulness of this notion as both concept and method invites a parallel focus on ‘seeing like a corporation’. Together they forge a significant hybrid field, one marked by high-level coordination between ‘narrow constellation’ of powers ‘at the intersection of neoliberalism and Asia-Pacific state-capitalism’ (Gibson et al, 2022: 1). What these authors call a new public–private hybridisation ‘exerts a force’ which is sociologically observable in ‘the way it attracts people, draws them in, coalesces and expends their capacities’ (Simone, 2013: 243).…”
Section: Questions Contexts and Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The effort to provide this missing link responds to two important more generalisable calls, namely (1) the call for ‘augmented concepts and research methods to comprehend hybrid urban governance reconfigurations that benefit market actors but eschews competition in favour of deal making between elite state and private actors’ (Gibson et al, 2022: 1), and (2) the call for better understanding ‘how humans inhabit their “ecological niches”’ (Rose et al, 2022:1), that is, delineating pathways between altered types of the everyday and new types of governmentality (Rose, 1996; Vanolo, 2014). In particular, we argue that the notion of ‘re-figuration of space’ (Löw and Knoblauch, 2021) helps to close the gap in research and offers a working solution to two aforementioned tasks.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Examples include portraying local planning systems as too bureaucratic and slow, and protesters as anti-progress or self-interested. Such claims give support to the creation of parallel national or state level approval processes for fast-tracking infrastructure planning decisions and rescaling planning powers away from local governments ( Gibson et al, 2022 ; McManus and Haughton, 2021 ).…”
Section: The Depoliticisation and Repoliticisation Of Infrastructure ...mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This focus on hybrid rationalities in relation to environmental interventions extends recent scholarship on hybrid forms of state-capitalism and hybrid urban governance arrangements, in which ever changing constellations of actors are brought together in new governance ensembles. The movement of actors across sectors, for instance between the public and private sectors, further blurs the distinctiveness in how different types of actors understand problems and potential solutions (Mulligan et al, 2020;Taşan-Kok, 2021;Gibson et al, 2022). Examining these trends in relation to the grant-seeking activities of governance ensembles in the environmental sector reveals a parallel hybridization of rationalities that reflects the blurring of relationships within and between governance ensembles.…”
Section: Nature Conservationmentioning
confidence: 99%