1979
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.115.9.1100
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Cutaneous manifestations of tumoral calcinosis

Abstract: We have followed up a large family in which seven members have tumoral calcinosis. One girl had the skin lesions of localized calcinosis cutis apart from the typical subcutaneous deposits of calcium. Like most persons with tumoral calcinosis, our patient had normal serum calcium concentrations; however, the serum phosphorus levels were greatly elevated. The familial occurrence and elevated serum phosphorus levels suggest the possibility of some as yet undefined, heritable metabolic defect as the underlying cau… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(19 citation statements)
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“…[12][13][14] Idiopathic calcification occurs in the absence of identifiable local or systemic factors, and includes idiopathic calcified nodules of the scrotum and tumoral calcinosis. 1,15 The patient presented in case 1 had secondary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcemia at baseline, but did not develop platelike calcifications until after receiving IV calcium infusions and developed lesions only within areas of prior actinic elastic tissue damage. She therefore not only demonstrates features of both metastatic (secondary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalcemia, calcium infusions) and dystrophic (lesions occurring exclusively in areas of sun-damaged skin) calcification, but also illustrates how cutaneous calcification may be preferentially distributed in areas of underlying tissue damage (ie, locus minoris resistentiae).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[12][13][14] Idiopathic calcification occurs in the absence of identifiable local or systemic factors, and includes idiopathic calcified nodules of the scrotum and tumoral calcinosis. 1,15 The patient presented in case 1 had secondary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcemia at baseline, but did not develop platelike calcifications until after receiving IV calcium infusions and developed lesions only within areas of prior actinic elastic tissue damage. She therefore not only demonstrates features of both metastatic (secondary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalcemia, calcium infusions) and dystrophic (lesions occurring exclusively in areas of sun-damaged skin) calcification, but also illustrates how cutaneous calcification may be preferentially distributed in areas of underlying tissue damage (ie, locus minoris resistentiae).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It occurs without calcium and phosphorus metabolic abnormalities and may be localized or generalized [16, 17]. Tumoral calcification is a rare familial disorder found in patients with an elevated serum phosphorus level but normal calcium level, usually presenting as large subcutaneous calcium deposits near joints and pressure areas [18]. Metastatic calcification is associated with an elevated serum calcium or phosphorus level, as seen in hyperparathyroidism and chronic renal failure [19], and most commonly affects the media of arteria and visceral organs.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…TC is a distinct condition (1,9) characterized by deposition of large calcified masses in the soft tissues around the large joints of the body, predominantly the hips, elbows, shoulders and ankles, without limitation of their motion (3,8). These asymptomatic, palpable, and visible tumors (2,9,10) tend to ulcerate through the overlying skin, draining a creamy or paste-like chalky fluid with a high content of calcium (1)(2)(3)(4)7).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The discharge of softened material from calcified masses through sinuses in the overlying skin is one of the characteristic features of tumoral calcinosis (TC) (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6). Among the large number of cases published during the last ten decades on the various forms of soft tissue calcification (7,8), TC is considered a rare disorder with a still poorly understood etiology (1,2,4,9,10). As some authors have affirmed (3), most dermatologists are probably unaware of this condition; hence the interest we found in describing the following unusual case.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%