1988
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.124.5.695
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Cutaneous angiomas in POEMS syndrome. An ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study

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Cited by 16 publications
(11 citation statements)
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“…Recent reports support the hypothesis that endothelial cell dysfunction may account for systemic manifestations in the POEMS syndrome [12][13][14]. Indeed, increased capillary leakage responsible for oedema, sclerodermalike cutaneous lesions, and skin and kidney endothelial cell pathological lesions has been described [12,13]. However, this hypothesis remains uncertain and little is known about the definite pathogenesis of this syndrome.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 92%
“…Recent reports support the hypothesis that endothelial cell dysfunction may account for systemic manifestations in the POEMS syndrome [12][13][14]. Indeed, increased capillary leakage responsible for oedema, sclerodermalike cutaneous lesions, and skin and kidney endothelial cell pathological lesions has been described [12,13]. However, this hypothesis remains uncertain and little is known about the definite pathogenesis of this syndrome.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 92%
“…Another possible explanation for the development of vascular proliferation could be the increase of estrogen levels in the serum of patients. 11,12 Although hormones were not measured, hemangioma cells being negative for both ER and PgR indicates that female sex hormones do not seem to play a major role in the development of skin lesions.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Frey’s syndrome), associated with diabetes mellitus or parotid diseases [21, 22, 33]. Cutaneous diseases described in association with localized hyperhidrosis include palmoplantar keratodermas, glomus tumor, blue rubber bleb nevus, sudoriferous nevus, POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, skin changes) syndrome, speckled lentiginous nevus syndrome, Riley-Day syndrome, pachydermoperiostosis, Gopalan syndrome, causalgia, pretibial myxedema, Buerger disease and eccrine pilar angiomatous hamartoma, local injury and increased size of eccrine glands [5,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37]. LUH, without other cutaneous findings, may occur as a symptom of disease of the central nervous system or peripheral neuropathy, such as stroke, trauma, syringomyelia, tabes dorsalis or pressure on a nerve root caused by a benign or malignant condition such as cervical rib, vertebral osteoma, mesothelioma or pulmonary carcinoma [3, 4,6,7,8,9, 11, 33, 38].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Since it was first described by Tarlov and Herz [1] in 1947, a limited number of cases has been reported in the medical literature [2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32]. LUH has been attributed to the organic diseases of the nervous system such as cerebral infarction [2, 3], Holmes-Adie syndrome [4], Riley-Day syndrome [5] or has been reported to occur secondary to malignancies [6,7,8,9].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%