2018
DOI: 10.1097/scs.0000000000004196 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Consensus does not exist regarding the best dosage regimen for using tranexamic acid (TXA) for patients undergoing open calvarial vault remodeling in craniosynostosis surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 2 dosing protocols, as well as the cost of using TXA. Previously, the institutional protocol was to give patients undergoing open calvarial vault remodeling a loading infusion of TXA (10 mg/kg) at the start of their procedure, after which intravenous TXA (5 mg/kg/h) was given throughout surgery a… Show more

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“…Of the reviewed studies, fifteen assessed the use of TXA in craniofacial surgery procedures [29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42][43]. Of these, nine were retrospective cohort studies [29-31, 34, 35, 38-40, 42], and six were randomized controlled clinical trials [32,33,36,37,41,43].…”
Section: Craniofacial Surgerymentioning
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“…Of the reviewed studies, fifteen assessed the use of TXA in craniofacial surgery procedures [29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42][43]. Of these, nine were retrospective cohort studies [29-31, 34, 35, 38-40, 42], and six were randomized controlled clinical trials [32,33,36,37,41,43].…”
Section: Craniofacial Surgerymentioning
“…Eight studies reported a notable decline in transfusion requirements, owing to decreased intraoperative bleeding, ranging from 19 to 85% [28,[31][32][33][34][37][38][39]. Other notable outcomes included a clearer surgical field [36], shorter length of hospital stay [40], lower drop in postoperative hemoglobin level, higher postoperative estimated red cell volume [30], and decreased surgical drain Fig.…”
Section: Craniofacial Surgerymentioning
“…Thirteen studies were eligible for our review. Of the 13 studies, 4 were prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trials [9,10,14,15], 9 were retrospective studies, tailored as a "before-after" studies, comparing blood loss and transfusion without/with TXA [16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24]. Study characteristics are presented in Table 1 and 2.…”
Section: Selection Of Reports and Study Designmentioning
“…Protocols of TXA administration varied from one study to another. A loading dose was commonly used, with doses ranging from 10 mg/kg [14,15,18,[20][21][22] to 100 mg/kg [16], usually infused over 15 minutes after induction of general anesthesia and before skin incision. A continuous infusion until skin closure was performed in all studies, with different protocols: 5 mg/kg/h [10,14,18,[20][21][22][23] or 10 mg/kg/h [9,16,17,19,24].…”
Section: Analysis Of Protocolsmentioning
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