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Abstract: Behavioural weight management interventions in research studies and clinical practice differ in length, advice, frequency of meetings, staff, and cost. Few real-world programmes have published patient outcomes and those that have used different ways of reporting information, making it impossible to compare interventions and develop the evidence base. To address this issue, we have developed a core outcome set for behavioural weight management intervention programmes for adults with overweight and obesity. Outc… Show more

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Cited by 21 publications
(35 citation statements)
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References 18 publications
(19 reference statements)
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“…We recommend that the ED research community may benefit from the development of an agreed standardized set of outcomes, known as “core outcome sets” (COS). A COS (see Mackenzie, Ells, Simpson, & Logue, (2020) for an example in the field of behavioral weight management interventions for adults with obesity) can be used as the minimum required to be reported for any study or trial. This enables other researchers to combine and compare the results of studies, over time, and from different countries and might comprise a primary set of eating‐related outcomes and measures relevant to the assessment of sexual function and dysfunction in individuals experiencing eating‐related difficulties.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We recommend that the ED research community may benefit from the development of an agreed standardized set of outcomes, known as “core outcome sets” (COS). A COS (see Mackenzie, Ells, Simpson, & Logue, (2020) for an example in the field of behavioral weight management interventions for adults with obesity) can be used as the minimum required to be reported for any study or trial. This enables other researchers to combine and compare the results of studies, over time, and from different countries and might comprise a primary set of eating‐related outcomes and measures relevant to the assessment of sexual function and dysfunction in individuals experiencing eating‐related difficulties.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Effective recommendations can only be made in the presence of well‐reported RCTs ‐ transparent descriptions of which are needed to inform the evidence‐base of ‘what works’ for specific participants, thus shaping real‐world BWMIs. STAR‐LITE was designed to complement a comprehensive list of core outcomes, developed through expert consensus, that should be reported by both weight management trials and real‐world interventions to facilitate comparisons of intervention effectiveness 19 …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The initial design phase brought together several published resources ‐ including similar reporting tools, 11,15,22‐24 intervention mapping reports, 2,6,15 NICE guidance and related commissioner feedback 5,15 ‐ to identify the key components required for detailed capture of BWMI delivery data (Table 1). Template creation intended to complement a pre‐defined core outcome set for BWMI reporting, 19 whilst aiming to address gaps in NICE knowledge 5 and areas of uncertainty via specific item inclusion.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…On the other hand, better quality studies demonstrated smaller effects compared with poorer quality studies, and the authors did not include studies with participants over 25 kg/m 2 ,69 which may impact the ability to transfer these findings into real-world settings. As recently highlighted, formation of a clear evidence base for behavioural interventions is often hindered by erratic implementation and reporting of outcomes 70. Thus, it is recto demonstrate an effect for PA and weight outcomes compared with PA-only interventions.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%