2001
DOI: 10.1002/1529-0131(200102)45:1<48::aid-anr83>3.3.co;2-t View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Objective. To analyze the use of various coping strategies in homogeneous groups of patients with hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease and to investigate the relationship between the state of the disease, the use of coping strategies, and management of the disease. Methods. The coping strategies measured by the Coping Strategies Questionnaire were analyzed in 3 homogeneous groups of 224 patients. Psychosocial well-being (PWB) measured by the Rand 36-item Health Survey 1.0 was used as an indicator of managem… Show more

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“…[e.g.,19,38,39,52,76,81,82,95] In the current study, the initial analyses supported these past findings in that as age increased, perceived life satisfaction also increased, and catastrophizing, depression, pain intensity, and pain interference decreased. However, when catastrophizing and depression were included in the multivariate model as predictor variables, these age-related findings became non-significant, suggesting that the pain-related dependent variables were more strongly associated with catastrophizing and depression than with age per se.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…[e.g.,19,38,39,52,76,81,82,95] In the current study, the initial analyses supported these past findings in that as age increased, perceived life satisfaction also increased, and catastrophizing, depression, pain intensity, and pain interference decreased. However, when catastrophizing and depression were included in the multivariate model as predictor variables, these age-related findings became non-significant, suggesting that the pain-related dependent variables were more strongly associated with catastrophizing and depression than with age per se.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…However, American Indians who chose to endure painful symptoms were significantly older (mean age ϭ 62.0 years) than persons who used pain control (mean age ϭ 55 years) or who ignored their pain (mean age ϭ 43 years, F[2,33] ϭ 3.50, P ϭ 0.042). Negative thoughts and catastrophizing, which have been associated with poor psychological outcomes (25)(26)(27) and greater physical disability (28), were generally absent in the narrative responses during indepth interviews with the current sample. These findings underscore the cultural value of embracing and adapting to present circumstances but highlight the subtlety that might be expected in communications related to pain.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…It is evident that treatments' improvements have meant a great benefit for patients due to allow them to have a normalized life, less bleeding and limitations but the psychosocial variables have a moderating effect in these results, such as age. In our case, age did not show significant differences but as pointed out by Santavirta et al, there were differences between age groups in pain perception and coping. Younger patients use more negative coping strategies such as catastrophism than the older ones who use more positive strategies such as distraction.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Brodin et al also found that middle‐aged patients expressed better adaptation than younger patients. Another variable to take into account is the perception and attitude towards the disease; some authors point out how patients with moderate or mild forms of haemophilia show poorer coping strategies than in severe forms due to the lack of experience and knowledge of symptoms …”
Section: Discussionmentioning