2016
DOI: 10.18404/ijemst.270186
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Abstract: Article HistoryReceived: 15 June 2016The aim of this paper is to examine the importance of contextualization of Nature of Science (NOS) within the Socioscientific Issues (SSI) framework, because of the importance to science education. The emphasis on advancing scientific literacy is contingent upon a robust understanding and appreciation of NOS, as well as the acquisition of socioscientific reasoning, skills, and values. Students" negotiations within SSI are influenced by a variety of factors related to NOS su… Show more

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Cited by 30 publications
(32 citation statements)
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References 41 publications
(84 reference statements)
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“…However, as the lessons progressed, the participating students had started to recognize the educational potentials of their members, and believed that collaborative practices could produce better results. This realization complements the longstanding linkages found in the literature between the NOS and using SSI as a context to reveal characteristics of NOS such as the cultural‐embeddedness of scientific knowledge and the moral/ethical considerations of science (Eastwood et al, ; Karisan & Zeidler, ; Sadler, Chambers, & Zeidler, ; Zeidler, Walker, Ackett, and Simmons ().…”
Section: Discussion and Implications For Science Educationsupporting
confidence: 53%
“…However, as the lessons progressed, the participating students had started to recognize the educational potentials of their members, and believed that collaborative practices could produce better results. This realization complements the longstanding linkages found in the literature between the NOS and using SSI as a context to reveal characteristics of NOS such as the cultural‐embeddedness of scientific knowledge and the moral/ethical considerations of science (Eastwood et al, ; Karisan & Zeidler, ; Sadler, Chambers, & Zeidler, ; Zeidler, Walker, Ackett, and Simmons ().…”
Section: Discussion and Implications For Science Educationsupporting
confidence: 53%
“…These instruments may inhibit capturing students' expression of important contextualized NOS features as they relate to other important SSI considerations (e.g., sociocultural concerns). A number of authors have raised this precise concern (Allchin, ; Allchin et al, ; Clough, ; Hodson, ; Karisan & Zeidler, ; Matthews, ). Hodson (, p. 29) sums the point up well:
Decontextualized questions…can seem infuriatingly vague to the student and be met with seeming incomprehension…Conversely, context embedded questions have domain specific knowledge requirements that may sometimes preclude students from formulating a response that properly reflects their NOS views…Put simply, questions set in one context may trigger different responses from essentially the same questions set in a different context.
…”
Section: Purposementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, assessments must be used that better account for how students' contextual NOS views, sociocultural awareness, and compassion for others develops through SSI interventions (Karisan & Zeidler, ).…”
Section: Purposementioning
confidence: 99%
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