1990
DOI: 10.1002/qre.4680060405
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Abstract: Truth emerges more readily from error than confusion' FRANCIS BACON SUMMARY As a science, reliability has now entered middle age, having achieved almost 40 years of recognized modern practice. As we move into the new decade of the 1990s it is appropriate that we review the status of modern reliability. The history of science has lessons for us to learn concerning the nature of paradigm changes. Clearly some reliability practitioners have had difficulty changing their own world views as scientific knowledge has… Show more

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Cited by 25 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…However, this approach is inaccurate at determining field failure rates and does not produce reliable lifetime predictions [7]- [12]. In contrast, the physics of failure approach, based on failure modes and mechanisms as a function of the stress conditions, provides useful reliability information.…”
Section: A Reliability and Prognostic Approachesmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…However, this approach is inaccurate at determining field failure rates and does not produce reliable lifetime predictions [7]- [12]. In contrast, the physics of failure approach, based on failure modes and mechanisms as a function of the stress conditions, provides useful reliability information.…”
Section: A Reliability and Prognostic Approachesmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…This question has been discussed by McLinn [10], who suggested that it is time to create a new and better paradigm to replace the "defunct" exponential distribution that has served electronics for the past 45 years. Based on a 1991 critical review [1] of proposed reliability models for advanced microelectronic devices of high gate count (e.g., VLSI, VHSIC), it was recommended that the assumption of a constant failure rate be considered invalid.…”
Section: Is Constant Failure Rate Modeling a Paradigm In Transition?mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Wong in 1989 [4] examined the roller-coaster behaviour of the failure rate of electronic components and, by means of existing data gleaned from papers as old as 1961 postulates that we have become bewitched by the traditional "bathtub" curve whereas in reality the curve is more like a roller-coaster. McLinn [5] states that "The constant failure rate model is no longer valid for electronic systems as a general model. It is time to say good-bye".…”
Section: Problems and Shortcomings With Reliability Demonstration Testingmentioning
confidence: 99%