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“…These overall patterns are qualitatively similar to those found in a previous study of variation in seedling growth traits among native Monterey pine populations (Hoeksema and Thompson 2007). Although greater relative allocation to aboveground biomass is often interpreted as a response to light limitation in plants (Tilman 1988), in native Monterey pine populations fog moisture is also (in addition to light) an important ''aboveground'' resource (Rogers et al 2005), and lower root : shoot ratios of Cedros Island seedlings may reflect adaptation for capturing fog moisture on needles in that extremely arid climate. The observations that RGR and SRL were both lower in sympatric combinations of pine genotypes and soils compared to allopatric combinations suggests the possibility of overall local adaptation or maladaptation of those traits to one or more soil characteristics, e.g., chemical properties or composition of pathogenic or ectomycorrhizal fungi.…”
Section: Geographic Divergence In Growth and Mycorrhizal Traits Of Mosupporting
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“…These overall patterns are qualitatively similar to those found in a previous study of variation in seedling growth traits among native Monterey pine populations (Hoeksema and Thompson 2007). Although greater relative allocation to aboveground biomass is often interpreted as a response to light limitation in plants (Tilman 1988), in native Monterey pine populations fog moisture is also (in addition to light) an important ''aboveground'' resource (Rogers et al 2005), and lower root : shoot ratios of Cedros Island seedlings may reflect adaptation for capturing fog moisture on needles in that extremely arid climate. The observations that RGR and SRL were both lower in sympatric combinations of pine genotypes and soils compared to allopatric combinations suggests the possibility of overall local adaptation or maladaptation of those traits to one or more soil characteristics, e.g., chemical properties or composition of pathogenic or ectomycorrhizal fungi.…”
Section: Geographic Divergence In Growth and Mycorrhizal Traits Of Mosupporting
“…A number of diverse species are in similar situations: Bermuda cedar ( Juniperus bermudiana ), invasive on some oceanic islands and endangered in Bermuda (Adams ); Monterey pine ( Pinus radiata ), invasive in Australia and New Zealand and endangered in California and Mexico (Rogers et al. ); arapaima ( Arapaima gigas ), invasive in Bolivia and endangered in Brazil (Miranda‐Chumacero et al. ); European wild rabbit ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ), invasive in many places and endangered in Iberia (Lees & Bell ); banteng ( Bos javanicus ), invasive in Australia and endangered in Bali (Bradshaw et al.…”
Section: Other Invasive and Endangered Speciesmentioning
“…b This is the percent protected based on the minimum forest area estimate. c On Guadalupe Island, it is more appropriate to measure the pine forest by number of trees (approximately 220) rather than area occupied (Rogers et al, 2004). shifting populations (e.g., Burdon et al, 1992;Millar, 1998Millar, , 1999 is a topic that continues to develop with new climatic, fossil, and genetic evidence. However, the common perception is one of a dynamic species, responsive to climatic triggers.…”
Section: Dynamic Evolutionary Historymentioning
“…There are approximately 220 (AE20) mature pines remaining there, based on a 2001 census (Rogers et al, 2004). Remaining snags and reports (Madden, 1949) suggest a pine forest historically that was considerably larger than the present range.…”
Section: Habitat Loss and Fragmentationmentioning
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