1986
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.122.11.1257
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Congenital nevomelanocytic nevi. Histologic patterns in the first year of life and evolution during childhood

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Cited by 27 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…Excision of head and neck lesions often involves tissue expansion, 11 and in all surgical approaches, nevus cells may be left behind following excision, because CMN nevus cells often extend deeply along skin appendages and even into skeletal muscle. 12 The impact of surgery on the risk of developing melanoma remains unclear. If surgery is considered for cosmetic reasons, factors such as the optimal time for scarring (probably best in the neonatal period), the risk of general anaesthesia, and the relative increase in size of the nevus compared with the body (which is site dependent) have to be considered.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Excision of head and neck lesions often involves tissue expansion, 11 and in all surgical approaches, nevus cells may be left behind following excision, because CMN nevus cells often extend deeply along skin appendages and even into skeletal muscle. 12 The impact of surgery on the risk of developing melanoma remains unclear. If surgery is considered for cosmetic reasons, factors such as the optimal time for scarring (probably best in the neonatal period), the risk of general anaesthesia, and the relative increase in size of the nevus compared with the body (which is site dependent) have to be considered.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…More or less specific features of a congenital nevus (present at birth) include a lesional size greater than 1.5 cm, the presence of nevus cells within the epithelium of skin appendages, or a convincing historical confirmation that the lesion was present at birth. 62 In the absence of these features, these lesions may be regarded as most likely to be acquired nevi (congenital pattern nevi or 'tardive' congenital nevi). Although these lesions are very common in the community, there is an association of these 'congenital pattern nevi' with melanoma, although this is insufficient to warrant wholesale eradication of these lesions with the aim of preventing melanoma.…”
Section: Nevi Of the Head And Neckmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The dermal component in this lesion is composed predominantly of type-B nevus cells that extend throughout the dermis as single cells separated by collagen into the subcutaneous tissue. This distribution is characteristic of a congenital nevus (Mark et al 1973 ;Rhodes 1986 ;Stenn et al 1983 ;Cribier et al 1999 ). In addition, there are foci of pigmented nevus cells but are sparsely distributed without any evidence of nested cell aggregates.…”
Section: Diagnosis Congenital Dermal Nevusmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…A variety of studies have shown that there are distinctive criteria that allow the diagnosis of a CMN including (1) size, (2) the depth of involvement by nevus cells, and (3) adnexal or vascular involvement (Reed 1993 ;Mark et al 1973 ). The depth of nevus cell involvement develops early and correlates with the size of CMN and remains unchanged (Zitelli et al 1984 ;Rhodes 1986 ;Barnhill and Fleischli 1995 ). These criteria are discussed in details in ensuing chapter.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%