2012
DOI: 10.1590/s1984-46702012000500005
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Conflicts between river dolphins (Cetacea: Odontoceti) and fisheries in the Central Amazon: a path toward tragedy?

Abstract: ABSTRACT. Dolphin interactions with fishermen have increased significantly and pose potential risks to the boto, Inia geoffrensis (Blainville, 1817), and the tucuxi, Sotalia fluviatilis (Gervais & Deville, 1853). The main objective of the present paper was to describe the existing conflicts between river dolphins and fishermen in the municipality of

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Cited by 44 publications
(37 citation statements)
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References 15 publications
(12 reference statements)
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“…Similar harmful behaviours targeting protected marine mammal species are also known to occur in other geographic regions (e.g. Alves, Zappes, & Andriolo, ; Leeney et al, ; Loch, Marmontel, & Simoes‐Lopes, ; Mintzer, Diniz, & Frazer, ; Robards & Reeves, ), with negative fishery interactions being the main threats for some threatened populations (Turvey et al, ; Zappes, da Silva, et al, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 71%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Similar harmful behaviours targeting protected marine mammal species are also known to occur in other geographic regions (e.g. Alves, Zappes, & Andriolo, ; Leeney et al, ; Loch, Marmontel, & Simoes‐Lopes, ; Mintzer, Diniz, & Frazer, ; Robards & Reeves, ), with negative fishery interactions being the main threats for some threatened populations (Turvey et al, ; Zappes, da Silva, et al, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 71%
“…First, harmful behaviours such as the consumption of marine mammal meat, which were documented at relatively high levels in local fishing communities (Figure a, b), require strict management and increased enforcement (Liu et al, ), especially in southern and western Hainan (Figure c, d). Second, environmental and regulatory education should be improved to raise awareness and enthusiasm in local communities about marine mammal conservation, and to reduce the support and demand for selling and eating marine mammal meat (Figure d; Alves et al, ; Manzan & Lopes, ; Pont et al, ). Third, because reported income from fishing was generally low among respondents (Figure S1), and low fishing income was associated with an increased likelihood of having sold marine mammal meat (Figure e), it is suggested that more sustainable sources of income could be assessed as a potential replacement for fishing activities in low‐income communities (Bashir et al, ; Bearzi et al, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Deliberate killing for use as bait is the primary threat affecting botos. Boto carcasses are being used to attract the catfish commonly known as piracatinga in Brazil and mota in Colombia (Calophysus macropterus) (G omez et al 2008;Loch et al 2009;Portocarrero Aya et al 2010a;Trujillo et al 2010a, b;Brum 2011;da Silva et al 2011;Alves et al 2012;G omez-Salaz ar et al 2012a;Mintzer et al 2013;Iriarte and Marmontel 2013a, b;Brum et al 2015). Demand for mota has increased in Colombia in the last decade because it is acting as a replacement for another catfish known as capaz (Pimelodus grosskopfii) that has been overfished (Petrere et al 2004, G omez et al 2008, Trujillo et al 2010b.…”
Section: Implications For Conservationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although piracatinga fishery in the upper Solimões River began possibly as early as the mid‐1990s, the first record of this fishery in Brazil was in 2000, when researchers became concerned about the impact on dolphin and caiman populations and called attention to the potential ecological problems (Da Silveira and Viana, ; Da Silva et al., ; Alves et al., ; Iriarte and Marmontel, , ; Mintzer et al., ). By 2007, piracatinga yields in Brazil were around 1 600 000 kg, ranking 29 th among the Amazon's largest commercial fisheries (Barthem and Goulding, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%