2003
DOI: 10.1590/s1413-86702003000200008
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Abstract: Bacterial counts were made of catheter insertion site and of catheter tips to help determine risk factors associated with catheterization of the jugular and subclavian veins. Among the 116 patients included in this study, 69% had central venous catheters (CVC) in the subclavian vein. Seven or more days catheterization (p=0.001) and > or =3 invasive devices (p=0.01) were infection risk factors associated with catheterization of the jugular vein. More than half of the patients presented high colony counts at the… Show more

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Cited by 28 publications
(18 citation statements)
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References 23 publications
(18 reference statements)
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“…Gender, duration of CVC use, CVC location, and CVC type were predictive for a positive culture, which is in agreement with several publications on independent risk factors for catheter-site colonization and catheter-related infections [15,18,19]. After correction for these variables, no effect of honey on frequency of positive skin cultures was detected in a multivariate logistic regression model.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Gender, duration of CVC use, CVC location, and CVC type were predictive for a positive culture, which is in agreement with several publications on independent risk factors for catheter-site colonization and catheter-related infections [15,18,19]. After correction for these variables, no effect of honey on frequency of positive skin cultures was detected in a multivariate logistic regression model.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…HICPAC examined a number of studies that compared insertion sites and concluded that CVCs inserted into subclavian veins had a lower risk for catheter-related infection than those inserted into either jugular or femoral veins. 345,408,[426][427][428][429][430][431][432][433][434] Guideline developers suggested that internal jugular insertion sites may pose a greater risk for infection because of their proximity to oropharyngeal secretions and because CVCs at this site are difÀ cult to immobilise. 334 However, mechanical complications associated with catheterisation might be less common with internal jugular than with subclavian vein insertion.…”
Section: Subclavian Jugular and Femoral Placementsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In our study, more colonization was observed at the subclavian site than at the forearm site. Sadoyama et al demonstrated that more colonization was observed at the subclavian site than at the jugular site in patients with CVCs at the intensive care unit (21). The subclavian site may be more vulnerable to skin flora than previously recognized; however, no definitive relevance with clinical infection was demonstrated in our study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%