2018
DOI: 10.23855/preslia.2018.059
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Abstract: It is thought that future climate change is likely to foster biological invasions, but effects of climate warming on invasions in recent decades are little explored. In this paper, we analyse the history of the spread of Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed) in central Europe in order to determine the effects of climate warming. In addition, we infer the likely history of this species' spread and current distribution from incomplete documentation. The area studied in central Europe includes Austria,

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Cited by 12 publications
(15 citation statements)
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References 52 publications
(69 reference statements)
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“…As already mentioned in the introduction, there are very different accounts of the history of the invasion by the common ragweed in the Austrian and the Hungarian scientific literature. To summarize simply, researchers in both countries were aware that ragweed was present and causing problems in their own country, but due to the lack of access to relevant sources they assumed that the presence of this species in the other country is a more recent phenomenon and due to recent political, social and economic changes (Kiss & Béres 2006, Essl et al 2009, Novák et al 2011, Mang et al 2018. This obviously cannot be true, and we hope that this paper will help in disentangling this situation.…”
Section: Historical Context Of the Different Frequencies Recorded Alomentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…As already mentioned in the introduction, there are very different accounts of the history of the invasion by the common ragweed in the Austrian and the Hungarian scientific literature. To summarize simply, researchers in both countries were aware that ragweed was present and causing problems in their own country, but due to the lack of access to relevant sources they assumed that the presence of this species in the other country is a more recent phenomenon and due to recent political, social and economic changes (Kiss & Béres 2006, Essl et al 2009, Novák et al 2011, Mang et al 2018. This obviously cannot be true, and we hope that this paper will help in disentangling this situation.…”
Section: Historical Context Of the Different Frequencies Recorded Alomentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although climatic constraints will limit its final distribution, common ragweed is still spreading both at global and local scales (Essl et al 2015, Ortmans et al 2017. This spread is likely to be further facilitated by climate warming (Storkey et al 2014, Case & Stinson 2018, Mang et al 2018 and by the ability of this species to quickly adapt to new environmental conditions (Li et al 2015, Scalone et al 2016, Onen et al 2017, Gorton et al 2018, van Boheemen et al 2019. Rapid ragweed spread is often associated with major socioeconomic transitions causing an increase in the amount of disturbed land (Kiss & Béres 2006).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Ecological extinction and declining ecosystem biodiversity, particularly of specialist species, has been reported for many years (IUCN Reports). The human impact on the environment is exhibited primarily in the extinction of key native dominant species, resulting in significant changes in primary productivity, along with many other ecological phenomena such as changes in species ranges or invasion of alien species (Hooper et al 2012;Allen et al 2015;Mang et al 2018). Another important factor responsible for changes in plant communities is land use change and improvements in farming systems, which have a strong influence on vegetation, especially on a local scale.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%