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“…Common to many Aboriginal worldviews is the understanding that all things are related and connected to each other (Shaw et al 2006;Mack 2011). Aboriginal conceptions of property reflect this relational ontology, which emphasizes connections and relations between humans, ancestors, spirit beings, animals, plants, and what most Westerners would consider inanimate nature (Feit 2004;Ingold 2004). Shaped by this worldview, it is difficult to frame Aboriginal property understandings within Western ideas about ownership (Bryan 2000;Nadasdy 2002).…”
Section: Western and Aboriginal Propertymentioning
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“…Common to many Aboriginal worldviews is the understanding that all things are related and connected to each other (Shaw et al 2006;Mack 2011). Aboriginal conceptions of property reflect this relational ontology, which emphasizes connections and relations between humans, ancestors, spirit beings, animals, plants, and what most Westerners would consider inanimate nature (Feit 2004;Ingold 2004). Shaped by this worldview, it is difficult to frame Aboriginal property understandings within Western ideas about ownership (Bryan 2000;Nadasdy 2002).…”
Section: Western and Aboriginal Propertymentioning
“…Then I had my own introduction to the transpersonal, and I found F or more than 100 years, Native/First-Nation wisdom keepers have been telling anthropologists that the cosmos is animated and responsive to human intention. Tribal peoples from geographic regions as widely separated as the Western Australian desert (Poirier, 2008), the forests of Southern India (Bird-David, 1999), the northern climes of East Central Canada (Ingold, 2004;Poirier, 2011), the great plains of North America (Ross, 1989), and lowland Amazonia (Descola, 1996;Viveiros de Castro, 1998) have insisted that being is not a sui generis state, but rather a matter of relationship. As Bird-David so succinctly captured it, the motto of these tribal peoples is not so much the Cartesian "I think, therefore I am," as it is "I relate, therefore I am" and "I know as I relate" (p. S78).…”
Section: International Journal Of Transpersonal Studies 118mentioning
“…Th e time of research becomes both a time of communication and silence 10 -a time of 'lived time' -and the space of research becomes a space of dwelling, in fact a 'poetics of dwelling' (cf. Ingold, 2004), rather than building. Here what Pillai writes about Gandhi's modes of participation in social service from a Heideggerian point of view can be helpful in going beyond an instrumentalist approach to participatory research: "Gandhi's participation in the life of his time was always (at the same time) an interior journey, an exploration of his being, and not just working out of a pre-established strategy.…”
Section: By the Way Of Conclusionmentioning