2020
DOI: 10.1075/sibil.60.06ars View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: This chapter reports on a preliminary study examining the production of grammatical evidentiality forms in narrative speech samples elicited from heritage language speakers (HLS) of Turkish. Turkish grammatically marks direct and indirect sources of evidence one has for his statement. We explored (i) how Turkish HLS use evidentiality marking as compared to monolingual Turkish speakers, and (ii) which factors predict their performances in producing evidentiality. Our findings showed that the HLS made a large nu… Show more

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“…On the other hand, it has been noted that the acquisition of evidentiality is vulnerable to incomplete acquisition by bilinguals. Heritage speakers of Turkish have less sensitivity to evidentiality marking, as compared to Turkish speakers in Turkey, using sentence comprehension (Arslan, De Kok & Bastiaanse, 2017), eye-movement-monitoring experiments (Arslan, Bastiaanse & Felser, 2015), sentence production (Schmid & Karayayla, 2020), and naturalistic speech production tasks (Arslan & Bastiaanse, 2020; Karayayla, 2020). The findings demonstrated that Turkish heritage language speakers tend to consider the direct evidential form as a default version of past tense and they often produce direct evidentials even where indirect evidentials might be more appropriate (Arslan, 2020; Arslan & Bastiaanse, 2020).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
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“…On the other hand, it has been noted that the acquisition of evidentiality is vulnerable to incomplete acquisition by bilinguals. Heritage speakers of Turkish have less sensitivity to evidentiality marking, as compared to Turkish speakers in Turkey, using sentence comprehension (Arslan, De Kok & Bastiaanse, 2017), eye-movement-monitoring experiments (Arslan, Bastiaanse & Felser, 2015), sentence production (Schmid & Karayayla, 2020), and naturalistic speech production tasks (Arslan & Bastiaanse, 2020; Karayayla, 2020). The findings demonstrated that Turkish heritage language speakers tend to consider the direct evidential form as a default version of past tense and they often produce direct evidentials even where indirect evidentials might be more appropriate (Arslan, 2020; Arslan & Bastiaanse, 2020).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Heritage speakers of Turkish have less sensitivity to evidentiality marking, as compared to Turkish speakers in Turkey, using sentence comprehension (Arslan, De Kok & Bastiaanse, 2017), eye-movement-monitoring experiments (Arslan, Bastiaanse & Felser, 2015), sentence production (Schmid & Karayayla, 2020), and naturalistic speech production tasks (Arslan & Bastiaanse, 2020; Karayayla, 2020). The findings demonstrated that Turkish heritage language speakers tend to consider the direct evidential form as a default version of past tense and they often produce direct evidentials even where indirect evidentials might be more appropriate (Arslan, 2020; Arslan & Bastiaanse, 2020). Further, L2 learners of Turkish demonstrated similar difficulties in acquiring different uses of non-firsthand form (Kaili, Çeltek & Papadopoulou, 2016; Kaya-Soykan, Antonova-Unlu & Sagin-Simsek, 2020).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…2 Heritage language speakers (HSs) are defined as "simultaneous or sequential (successive) bilingual [s] whose weaker language corresponds to the minority language of their society and whose stronger language is the dominant language of that society" (Polinsky, 2018, p.9). indeed linguists have identified multiple areas of grammar in which both groups seem to pattern together and to differ from adult L1 speakers (Benmamoun et al, 2014;Arslan, 2015;Sekerina;Sauermann, 2015;Arslan;Bastiaanse, 2020). However, these converging characteristics should not be taken as evidence that the heritage grammar "froze" mid-way to the adult L1 grammar (see e.g., Polinsky, 2011 for evidence of reanalysis).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning