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Cited by 14 publications
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“…Here, activation of a system which is supposed to record food intake not only has a basically aversive component to it, rather than a positively reinforcing one, but seems to be more rather than less aversive when the animal is hungry. The data appear, therefore, to add to the accumulating evidence that is incompatible with the simple "satiety center" hypothesis [see Mogenson, (1974), Panksepp (1974) and Rabin (1972), for reviews and Davis, Nakajima, and White (1974) and Sclafani, Berner, and Maul (1975) for more recent evidence] .…”
Section: ;mentioning
confidence: 73%
“…Here, activation of a system which is supposed to record food intake not only has a basically aversive component to it, rather than a positively reinforcing one, but seems to be more rather than less aversive when the animal is hungry. The data appear, therefore, to add to the accumulating evidence that is incompatible with the simple "satiety center" hypothesis [see Mogenson, (1974), Panksepp (1974) and Rabin (1972), for reviews and Davis, Nakajima, and White (1974) and Sclafani, Berner, and Maul (1975) for more recent evidence] .…”
Section: ;mentioning
confidence: 73%
“…Current explanations favor a role for brain catecholamines in feeding (e.g., Grossman, 1975;Mogenson, 1974), and although intrahypothalamic injections of norepinephrine which induce feeding failed to initiate hoarding activity , other studies have reported that injections of amphetamine reduce both feeding and hoarding (Blundell, 1971;Zucker & Milner, 1964). Since the effects of amphetamine on feeding may be largely mediated via catecholamine mechanisms (e.g., Baez, 1974;Carey & Goodall, 1975;Holtzman & Jewett, 1971.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The results are interpreted as tentative support for the view that the lateral hypothalamus and midbrain interact in the control of ingestive behaviours, but the site of this interaction has not been determined.CLASSICAL LESION and stimulation studies suggest that the lateral hypothalamus is the focus of neural systems for the control of food and water intake (e.g., Stevenson, 1969). Recently several extra-hypothalamic structures, including midbrain sites (Lyon et al, 1968;Parker & Feldman, 1967;Skultety & Gary, 1962), have also been implicated in the control of feeding and drinking, and it has been suggested that there are important interactions between the hypothalamus and the midbrain in the initiation of ingestive and other motivated behaviours (Glickman & Schiff, 1967;Mogenson, 1974;Mogenson & Huang, 1973).One of the approaches to the study of the interaction of structures involved in the initiation of motivated behaviours is the use of the dual stimulation technique, in which pulses of stimulation are delivered to two sites. This technique has been used by Flynn et al (1970) to study the interactions between hypothalamic, limbic, and midbrain structures in aggressive behaviour, and by Sibole, Miller, & Mogenson (1971) to study the interaction between the septum and hypothalamus in drinking.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…CLASSICAL LESION and stimulation studies suggest that the lateral hypothalamus is the focus of neural systems for the control of food and water intake (e.g., Stevenson, 1969). Recently several extra-hypothalamic structures, including midbrain sites (Lyon et al, 1968;Parker & Feldman, 1967;Skultety & Gary, 1962), have also been implicated in the control of feeding and drinking, and it has been suggested that there are important interactions between the hypothalamus and the midbrain in the initiation of ingestive and other motivated behaviours (Glickman & Schiff, 1967;Mogenson, 1974;Mogenson & Huang, 1973).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%