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Cited by 134 publications
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References 21 publications
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“…4, with the global substrate strain increasing, three regimes can be found and are divided by two threshold strains: (i) when the global substrate strain is below the first threshold level, the contact central angle almost keeps unchanged; (ii) after the first threshold level, the contact central angle decreases very quickly with an increasing substrate strain; (iii) when the global substrate strain exceeds the second threshold level, the contact central angle almost equals zero. All the phenomena are very similar to the findings in the experiment of cells cultured on a cyclically stretch substrate, where cell reorientation is controlled by two threshold stretch amplitudes (Dartsch and Hammerle, 1986;Neidlingerwilke et al, 1994;Wang et al, 1995), and are consistent well with the results of an earlier model of an elastic cylinder adhering on a stretched substrate (Chen and Gao, 2006b).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 88%
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“…4, with the global substrate strain increasing, three regimes can be found and are divided by two threshold strains: (i) when the global substrate strain is below the first threshold level, the contact central angle almost keeps unchanged; (ii) after the first threshold level, the contact central angle decreases very quickly with an increasing substrate strain; (iii) when the global substrate strain exceeds the second threshold level, the contact central angle almost equals zero. All the phenomena are very similar to the findings in the experiment of cells cultured on a cyclically stretch substrate, where cell reorientation is controlled by two threshold stretch amplitudes (Dartsch and Hammerle, 1986;Neidlingerwilke et al, 1994;Wang et al, 1995), and are consistent well with the results of an earlier model of an elastic cylinder adhering on a stretched substrate (Chen and Gao, 2006b).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 88%
“…However, the behaviors of the contact area predicted by the present model show several features which appear to be qualitatively similar to that of cells cultured on a cyclically stretched substrate. Experiments on cell reorientation in response to cyclic substrate strain also show three characteristic regimes with two threshold strain amplitudes (Dartsch and Hammerle, 1986;Neidlingerwilke et al, 1994;Wang et al, 1995). It was found that cells do not respond to strain amplitudes smaller than 1-2% (Dartsch and Hammerle, 1986).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…While this loading protocol was not intended to represent a particular pathologic or surgical scenario, there are realistic examples of altered loading conditions that may give rise to comparable levels of tissue remodeling. For instance, a similar transition in mechanical environment could arise due to surgical implantation of a statically cultured vascular graft or myocardial patch into the dynamic host tissue, since most cell types align parallel to a static mechanical stretch but perpendicular to cyclic stretching 8,30,34 . Nevertheless, the relevant message from this work is that when designing living tissues, one cannot necessarily rely on contact guidance cues to sustain structural and functional anisotropy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Cells are known to respond to mechanical forces exerted through surrounding fluid, adhering beads or substrates [9,[12][13][14], and they could detach, slip or roll on a substrate in response to these forces [15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22]. For example, cells on a cyclically stretched substrate tend to reorient themselves away from the stretching direction [23][24][25][26][27], and cells migrate along a substrate with rigidity gradient (durotaxis) [18]. Blood cells are found to undergo a transition from rolling to translational motion on a blood vessel wall under increasing hydrodynamic shear forces [19], exemplifying a general fact that it takes less effort for a round object to roll than to slip on a substrate [28,29].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%