2021
DOI: 10.26451/abc.08.01.03.2021 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Humans evaluate others based on interactions between third parties, even when those interactions are of no direct relevance to the observer. Such social evaluation is not limited to humans. We previously showed that dogs avoided a person who behaved negatively to their owner (Chijiiwa et al., 2015). Here, we explored whether domestic cats, another common companion animal, similarly evaluate humans based on third-party interactions. We used the same procedure that we used with dogs: cats watched as their owner … Show more

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“…Our study adds to the literature reporting no evidence of eavesdropping in dogs [15,[25][26][27]] and other animals, including Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) [40], cats (Felis silvestris catus) [53,55] and some results on non-human primates [5,8,11]. The mixed results on eavesdropping in animals may be due to the different methodologies used, for example, whether the setup was a food-giving situation (e.g., [5,8,21,22,26] or a helping situation (e.g., [23,24]) and whether the subject observed human-human (e.g., [11,25,27,55]) or human-animal interactions (e.g., [15,28,40,53]).…”
Section: Plos Onementioning
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“…Our study adds to the literature reporting no evidence of eavesdropping in dogs [15,[25][26][27]] and other animals, including Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) [40], cats (Felis silvestris catus) [53,55] and some results on non-human primates [5,8,11]. The mixed results on eavesdropping in animals may be due to the different methodologies used, for example, whether the setup was a food-giving situation (e.g., [5,8,21,22,26] or a helping situation (e.g., [23,24]) and whether the subject observed human-human (e.g., [11,25,27,55]) or human-animal interactions (e.g., [15,28,40,53]).…”
Section: Plos Onementioning
“…Our study adds to the literature reporting no evidence of eavesdropping in dogs [15,[25][26][27]] and other animals, including Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) [40], cats (Felis silvestris catus) [53,55] and some results on non-human primates [5,8,11]. The mixed results on eavesdropping in animals may be due to the different methodologies used, for example, whether the setup was a food-giving situation (e.g., [5,8,21,22,26] or a helping situation (e.g., [23,24]) and whether the subject observed human-human (e.g., [11,25,27,55]) or human-animal interactions (e.g., [15,28,40,53]). We argue that using human-animal interactions enhanced the relevance of the interactions, especially since the WSC animals live in packs and regularly see conspecifics interacting with different people, like trainers (hand-raisers/very familiar), researchers (familiar) and visitors (unfamiliar).…”
Section: Plos Onementioning
“…In a related study, Russell et al (2008) found that chimpanzees preferred to sit close to generous versus selfish strangers after observing third-party interactions. It might be assumed that sociality contributes to the ability to learn from third-party interactions as less social species (e.g., domestic cats: Chijiiwa et al, 2021;Leete et al, 2020) have not yet shown reputation effects, but the ability has also been elusive in domestic dogs (Kundey et al, 2011;Nitzschner et al, 2012;Piotti et al, 2017). In fact, apparent evidence for reputation effects in dogs may be explained by local enhancement (Jim et al, 2020).…”
Section: Generalizing From Others' Knowledgementioning
“…Our main aim was to directly compare the behavioural responses of companion dogs and cats to a novel environment (laboratory room) as so far, most socio-cognitive tests on cats have been carried out at home (e.g., [ 9 , 10 , 11 ]) or in a familiar place [ 12 ], as cats were reported to be sensitive to changes in the environment [ 13 , 14 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning