2010
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-44462010000200014 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: ResumoObjetivo: Avaliar as relações entre o uso agudo e crônico de cannabis e alterações do humor. Método: Os artigos foram selecionados por meio de busca eletrônica no indexador PubMed. Capítulos de livros e as listas de referências dos artigos selecionados também foram revisados. Resultados: Observam-se elevados índices de comorbidade entre abuso/ dependência de cannabis e transtornos afetivos em estudos transversais e em amostras clínicas. Estudos longitudinais indicam que, em longo prazo, o uso mais intens… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
1
1
1
1
0
4
0
8

Year Published

2013
2013
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
4
1

Relationship

0
5

Authors

Journals

0
4
0
8
Order By: Relevance
“…Further, several studies (20, 21) suggest a bidirectional relationship, as cannabis use variables do not solely explain the psychiatric outcomes observed nor do pre-existing psychiatric conditions fully explain the increased use of cannabis. Some researchers (22) have suggested that individuals with high levels of anxiety sensitivity or hopelessness may be more sensitive to the negative reinforcement processes of substance use (i.e., the ability of substances to modulate negative affective states) than non-affected individuals; however, some individuals experiencing the onset of mania or depression are not more likely to report increased cannabis use than those not experiencing these disorders (23, 24). In addition, other authors (25) have questioned the hypothesis that individuals may use cannabis to self-medicate psychotic or depressive symptoms.…”
Section: Introduction: the Complexity Of Cannabis Misusementioning
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 7 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…Further, several studies (20, 21) suggest a bidirectional relationship, as cannabis use variables do not solely explain the psychiatric outcomes observed nor do pre-existing psychiatric conditions fully explain the increased use of cannabis. Some researchers (22) have suggested that individuals with high levels of anxiety sensitivity or hopelessness may be more sensitive to the negative reinforcement processes of substance use (i.e., the ability of substances to modulate negative affective states) than non-affected individuals; however, some individuals experiencing the onset of mania or depression are not more likely to report increased cannabis use than those not experiencing these disorders (23, 24). In addition, other authors (25) have questioned the hypothesis that individuals may use cannabis to self-medicate psychotic or depressive symptoms.…”
Section: Introduction: the Complexity Of Cannabis Misusementioning
“…The association between depression and cannabis use is long known there is a higher risk for the male gender; this observation is also shown in this study. Besides depression, other psychotic diseases such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia show association with cannabis use 31 . Along with this, a study suggests that individuals with higher genetic predisposition for schizophrenia are as much more likely to use cannabis as and in more quantity than those with no genetic predisposition.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“… 13 The model also includes protective elements: if the subject is well-nourished, the absence of minimally sufficient conditions may prevent the outcome (i.e., tuberculosis), prolong the latency period, or diminish the severity of illness. 7 Additionally, several psychiatric illnesses are compatible with the INUS model, such as schizophrenia 14 and bipolar disorder 15 in the presence of cannabis use; and depression and post-traumatic stress disorder after domestic violence. 16 …”
Section: Theoretical Backgroundmentioning