2014
DOI: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2013.11.026
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Abstract: Bennett, M.D. and Gillett, A. (2014) Butcherbird polyomavirus isolated from a grey butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus) inThis is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the c… Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
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“…All the avian-infecting polyomaviruses belong to the genus Avipolyomavirus (Johne et al, 2011). Six avipolyomaviruses species have been identified to date, namely: Avian polyomavirus (infecting various parrot species) (Müller & Nitschke, 1986), Goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus (infecting geese and ducks) (Guerin et al, 2000), Finch polyomavirus (infecting Pyrrhula pyrrhula griseiventris), Crow polyomavirus (infecting Corvus monedula) (Johne et al, 2006), Canary polyomavirus (infecting Serinus canaria) (Halami et al, 2010) and Butcherbird polyomavirus (infecting Cracticus torquatus) (Bennett & Gillett, 2014). Avian polyomaviruses are known to cause inflammatory disease in birds; in some species the acute clinical disease can result in high mortality (Guerin et al, 2000;Johne & Müller, 2007;Krautwald et al, 1989) and in some species chronic disease of skin and feathers (Krautwald et al, 1989;Wittig et al, 2007).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…All the avian-infecting polyomaviruses belong to the genus Avipolyomavirus (Johne et al, 2011). Six avipolyomaviruses species have been identified to date, namely: Avian polyomavirus (infecting various parrot species) (Müller & Nitschke, 1986), Goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus (infecting geese and ducks) (Guerin et al, 2000), Finch polyomavirus (infecting Pyrrhula pyrrhula griseiventris), Crow polyomavirus (infecting Corvus monedula) (Johne et al, 2006), Canary polyomavirus (infecting Serinus canaria) (Halami et al, 2010) and Butcherbird polyomavirus (infecting Cracticus torquatus) (Bennett & Gillett, 2014). Avian polyomaviruses are known to cause inflammatory disease in birds; in some species the acute clinical disease can result in high mortality (Guerin et al, 2000;Johne & Müller, 2007;Krautwald et al, 1989) and in some species chronic disease of skin and feathers (Krautwald et al, 1989;Wittig et al, 2007).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the case of non-psittacine species, goose polyomavirus has been characterized as the etiologic agent of fatal hemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of European geese (HNEG) (71). Other species of polyomaviruses have been identified in finches (72), crows (73) butcherbirds (74), and a novel APV was recently associated with a fatal outbreak in canaries (75). Moreover, a recent study revealed an APV isolated from pigeon feces in China showing almost 99% identity with previously identified psittacine strains, suggesting a much broader host range of APVs and undermined cross-species transmission (76).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Viruses belonging to the family of Polyomaviridae are detected in mammalian species, birds, and fish ( 1 ). So far, seven different viruses, budgerigar fledgling disease polyomavirus ( 2 ), goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus ( 3 ), finch polyomavirus ( 4 ), crow polyomavirus ( 4 ), canary polyomavirus ( 5 ), butcherbird polyomavirus ( 6 ) and Adélie penguin polyomavirus ( 7 ), have been identified in birds. In contrast to the mammalian polyomaviruses, the avian polyomaviruses can cause acute disease with high mortality rates in infected birds ( 8 ).…”
Section: Genome Announcementmentioning
confidence: 99%