1962
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.1962.01590040104021
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Burrowing Hair (Pili Cuniculati)

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Cited by 9 publications
(18 citation statements)
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“…Such linearly moving erythematous eruption due to a burrowing hair shaft, resembling an eruption caused by larva migrans, is poorly reported in the Western dermatological literature [2,3,4,5]. These cases involved the skin of the ankle [2], sole [3, 5], or toe [4], strongly suggesting that the causative hair fragments became embedded due to external friction stimuli.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Such linearly moving erythematous eruption due to a burrowing hair shaft, resembling an eruption caused by larva migrans, is poorly reported in the Western dermatological literature [2,3,4,5]. These cases involved the skin of the ankle [2], sole [3, 5], or toe [4], strongly suggesting that the causative hair fragments became embedded due to external friction stimuli.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These cases involved the skin of the ankle [2], sole [3, 5], or toe [4], strongly suggesting that the causative hair fragments became embedded due to external friction stimuli.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Since the first documented case of pilus migrans in 1957, 26 additional reports have been published [1][2][3][4][5][8][9][10][11][12][13][14], with patient age ranging from 15 months to 58 years, and 16 patients, including ours, being male [3,12].…”
Section: Pilus Migransmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Notably, a burrowing hair in the skin is also one of the causes of creeping eruptions. Such cases have been reported with various terms such as ‘imbedded hair’, 1 ‘bristle migrans’ 2 and ‘burrowing hair’, 3 and ‘creeping hair’ was recently proposed as a suitable term 4 . We report the clinical and histopathological findings in a case of creeping hair, which clinically resembled cutaneous larva migrans (CLM).…”
mentioning
confidence: 98%