2019
DOI: 10.1590/abd1806-4841.20199007
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Denise Miyamoto,
Claudia Giuli Santi,
Valéria Aoki
et al.

Abstract: Bullous pemphigoid is the most frequent autoimmune bullous disease and mainly affects elderly individuals. Increase in incidence rates in the past decades has been attributed to population aging, drug-induced cases and improvement in the diagnosis of the nonbullous presentations of the disease. A dysregulated T cell immune response and synthesis of IgG and IgE autoantibodies against hemidesmosomal proteins (BP180 and BP230) lead to neutrophil chemotaxis and degradation of the basement membrane zone. Bullous pe… Show more

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Cited by 95 publications
(120 citation statements)
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References 94 publications
(120 reference statements)
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“…An association between bullous pemphigoid and neurologic or psychiatric disorders has been identified [1][2][3]. Both of the men in this report had neurologic disorders, either epilepsy or Parkinsonism.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 57%
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“…An association between bullous pemphigoid and neurologic or psychiatric disorders has been identified [1][2][3]. Both of the men in this report had neurologic disorders, either epilepsy or Parkinsonism.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 57%
“…Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune blistering condition that usually occurs in elderly individuals. The immunopathogenesis of the disease is attributed to circulating and tissuebound autoantibodies directed against bullous pemphigoid antigen 230 (bullous pemphigoid antigen 1) or bullous pemphigoid antigen 180 (bullous pemphigoid antigen 2) or both [1][2][3]. The condition typically presents as pruritic tense subepidermal blisters.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…In particular, we asked whether patients in immunosuppressive therapy Among possible trigger factors of autoimmune blistering diseases, immunization and viral infections are mentioned in the literature, although the underlying immunological mechanism is still unclear. [7][8][9] The most acceptable hypothesis involves the possible molecular mimicry existing between viral and epidermal proteins, and over activation of the immune system as a consequence of the viral attack. 9 Indeed, in autoimmune blistering disorders, once the autoantibodies bind to…”
Section: Accepted Articlementioning
confidence: 99%