1988
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-1020037
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Abstract: From 1974 to 1986, there were 14 cases of bronchial stricture or obliteration caused by endobronchial tuberculous lesions. Nine cases had histories of tuberculosis but five were suspected of having malignant respiratory passage obstruction at the initial diagnosis. Five cases were kept under observation because of mildness of the subjective symptoms or refusal of operation. Nine cases underwent operation. As the bronchial lesions in three cases were confined to the lobar or segmental bronchus, lobectomies were… Show more

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Cited by 11 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…It can be caused by spread of tubercle bacilli within the airway lumen or along peribronchial lymphatic channels from an area of cavitations or tuberculous pneumonia11. Left-side airways are more commonly involved than right-side airways because they are anatomically compressed by the aortic arch, and the left main bronchus is vulnerable to pathologic stricture12. Taken together, these previous reports could explain the reason why the prominent side of pulmonary lesions were different from that of endobronchial lesions in our patient.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 49%
“…It can be caused by spread of tubercle bacilli within the airway lumen or along peribronchial lymphatic channels from an area of cavitations or tuberculous pneumonia11. Left-side airways are more commonly involved than right-side airways because they are anatomically compressed by the aortic arch, and the left main bronchus is vulnerable to pathologic stricture12. Taken together, these previous reports could explain the reason why the prominent side of pulmonary lesions were different from that of endobronchial lesions in our patient.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 49%
“…To date, we have treated 19 patients with endobronchial tuberculosis, some of whom were described in our previous report [9]. In this article, further results for these patients with those for additional, more recently treated patients are presented.…”
mentioning
confidence: 72%
“…The latter origin is commonly seen in children. In patients 8,9,14,18, and 19 the route was thought to be adenopathic infiltration. The disease in the other 14 cases probably resulted from direct inoculation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition FVC may be affected by pulmonary tuberculosis through lung tissue scarring, bronchial stenosis, bronchiectasis, fibrosis and pleural changes (38,41).…”
Section: Accepted Articlementioning
confidence: 99%