2009
DOI: 10.1177/030857590903300206
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Abstract: Birth family health history is shared with prospective adopters to help them understand a child's future health risks. But guidelines for health professionals indicate that such third-party information should not be shared without the consent of birth parents. In practice this can be difficult to achieve. Catherine Hill and Maria Edwards' survey of 57 adoptions sought to explore the views and experiences of adopters about the value of this information to both themselves and their child. Absence of information,… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(11 citation statements)
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“…The difficulty in obtaining this information from birth parents who are not engaging with services is frequently cited by social workers and is acknowledged. However, it must be noted that up to 75% of adopters in an Adoption UK study in 2008 (Hill and Edwards, 2009) felt that lack of information about their child's birth family history had been an issue. In addition to the practical aspects noted above, the study highlighted the importance of family history as forming part of a child's identity.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The difficulty in obtaining this information from birth parents who are not engaging with services is frequently cited by social workers and is acknowledged. However, it must be noted that up to 75% of adopters in an Adoption UK study in 2008 (Hill and Edwards, 2009) felt that lack of information about their child's birth family history had been an issue. In addition to the practical aspects noted above, the study highlighted the importance of family history as forming part of a child's identity.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Adopted individuals constitute one group whose health care may be affected by absent family history information. 9 11 Nevertheless, adoptees can face ethical and practical challenges when attempting to learn genetic risk information. 12 Anecdotal reports from PGT companies and in the media suggests that adoptees have used PGT from Family Tree DNA and 23andMe, Inc. (23andMe) to find biological family members and learn ancestry information.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Genetic information can facilitate the prevention, treatment or early diagnosis of genetic illnesses and can inform reproductive decision‐making. Yet for individuals who have been adopted, this information may be missing, incomplete, or not readily accessible (23). We demonstrate both ethical and practical challenges in the search for and communication of genetic information for adoptees and their birth relatives.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%