1969
DOI: 10.1021/bi00839a058
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Abstract: A study of the environmental conditions needed for maximal laboratory yields of pulvilloric acid, an antibiotic substance produced by Penicillium pulvillorum, led to the estimated production in stationary cultures of quantities over 1.3 g/1. The requisite medium is 5% glycerol-Czapek-Dox supplemented with 0.1 ml of corn steep liquor/1. Improvements in isolation and purification steps were found which overcame the major difficulty involved in work with this metabolite, i.e., its instability. A complete stepwise… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(3 citation statements)
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References 17 publications
(21 reference statements)
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“…Our results suggest that ‘pulvilloric acid’ which was previously identified in cultures of P. wotroi and P. araracuaraense and quite possibly P. pulvillorum itself, is not the structure as it exists on artificial solid and liquid growth media; it is the patented isochroman isolated from cultures of P. simplicissimum . The originally reported pulvilloric acid structure is known to be unstable and require careful extraction and work-up methodology, to avoid rearrangement and decomposition reactions from occurring during isolation ( Tanenbaum & Nakajima 1969 ). Therefore, it is reasonable to believe that the two structures could be inter-convertible due to an increased stability of the molecule provided by the aromatisation of the originally proposed structure of pulvilloric acid to its isochroman.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Our results suggest that ‘pulvilloric acid’ which was previously identified in cultures of P. wotroi and P. araracuaraense and quite possibly P. pulvillorum itself, is not the structure as it exists on artificial solid and liquid growth media; it is the patented isochroman isolated from cultures of P. simplicissimum . The originally reported pulvilloric acid structure is known to be unstable and require careful extraction and work-up methodology, to avoid rearrangement and decomposition reactions from occurring during isolation ( Tanenbaum & Nakajima 1969 ). Therefore, it is reasonable to believe that the two structures could be inter-convertible due to an increased stability of the molecule provided by the aromatisation of the originally proposed structure of pulvilloric acid to its isochroman.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Pulvilloric acid ( 220 ), a yellow antibiotic, was isolated in 1957 from acidified culture filtrates of Penicillium pulvillorum . Nine years later, its structure was elucidated on the basis of NMR data and chemical transformations. , It is commonly produced by phylogenetically related Penicillium species …”
Section: Azaphilonesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Furthermore, 9 was determined to form an adduct (10) with water at pH 7.4. 15 Pulvilloric acid (12) from Penicillium pulvillorum also had a quinone methide structure and readily formed adducts, such as CH 3 OH adduct ( 13) 16 or EtOH adduct ( 14). 17 Herein, 1 and 2 were thought to be the addition products of CH 3 OH and EtOH from the same compound.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%