2013
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100551
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Abstract: It has been known for millennia that large animals live longer, inspiring numerous theories of aging. For example, elephants and humans live longer than mice, which in turn live longer than worms and flies. The correlation is not perfect, with many explainable exceptions, but it is still obvious. In contrast, within each species (e.g., mice and some other mammals) small body size is associated with longevity and slow aging. The concept that aging (and age-related diseases) is an aimless continuation of develop… Show more

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Cited by 36 publications
(30 citation statements)
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References 67 publications
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“…These investigators reported an increase in mean life span (þ20%) and a slight maximum life span extension (þ3.5%) in males who received metformin neonatally, while a decrease in mean and median life span (29.1% and 213.8%, respectively) without significant differences in maximum life span was observed when female mouse pups were treated with metformin, as compared with control animals. The neonatal period is critical for the development of the hypothalamic circuits that control energy homeostasis (Contreras et al 2013) and it has been suggested that reprogramming of these circuits, especially the mTOR-signaling pathway, may be part of the aging process (Blagosklonny 2013). Many aspects of aging are controlled by the hypothalamus, and alteration of hypothalamic pathways might allow the manifestations of aging to be modified .…”
Section: Studies In Rodent Modelsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These investigators reported an increase in mean life span (þ20%) and a slight maximum life span extension (þ3.5%) in males who received metformin neonatally, while a decrease in mean and median life span (29.1% and 213.8%, respectively) without significant differences in maximum life span was observed when female mouse pups were treated with metformin, as compared with control animals. The neonatal period is critical for the development of the hypothalamic circuits that control energy homeostasis (Contreras et al 2013) and it has been suggested that reprogramming of these circuits, especially the mTOR-signaling pathway, may be part of the aging process (Blagosklonny 2013). Many aspects of aging are controlled by the hypothalamus, and alteration of hypothalamic pathways might allow the manifestations of aging to be modified .…”
Section: Studies In Rodent Modelsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Mouse strains with loss of function in the growth hormone/IGF-1 axis have a smaller body size and enhanced lifespan (Blagosklonny, 2013). The current results are the first to identify a loss of function gene mutation in mice that results in an increase in muscle and body mass along with enhanced longevity.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Most genetic models of enhanced longevity in mice have identified an inverse relationship between body mass and longevity, which has lead to the observation that ‘big mice die young’ (Blagosklonny, 2013). However, the results from the current study support the epidemiological observations in humans that when it comes to skeletal muscle mass and longevity, bigger may be better.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[46][47][48] It was stressed that aging is driven by the mTOR pathway, which is stimulated by food, growth factors, including insulin and IGF-1, androgens and some other factors. Females are have less body size and weight than males that could be related to a higher activity of mTOR pathway in males.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%