1998
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-1013090 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: As an alternative to cardioplegic arrest, "cardiac surgical conditions" (i.e. a flaccid heart which facilitates surgery) have been created by continuously perfusing the coronary arteries with normothermic blood and suppressing myocardial chronotropy and inotropy with the ultra-short acting beta-blocker esmolol. In contrast to cardioplegic arrest, minimal cardiac contraction is maintained. Using this technique, the myocardium is protected against ischemia by antegrade coronary blood flow and reduced metabolism.… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
1
1
1
0
4
0
1

Year Published

2001
2001
2002
2002

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

0
3

Authors

Journals

0
4
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…The total volume of esmolol required to induce and maintain cardiac arrest is quite low (the addition of a suitable volume of esmolol to oxygenated blood to make up a 1 mmol/L concentration) relative to potassium cardioplegia, for which volumes in excess of 1000 mL are required. Consequently, additional hemodilution during cardiopulmonary bypass should be avoided with esmolol arrest, in contrast to warm continuous-infusion of blood cardioplegia or the cardiac surgical condition induced with esmolol added to blood for continuous infusion, [14][15][16] multidose intermittent esmolol infusion would provide a still and blood-free operating field during warm (normothermic) heart surgery. This technique of multidose esmolol infusion can be used for coronary artery bypass surgery, or any other type of cardiac surgery.…”
Section: Limitations Of This Studymentioning
See 1 more Smart Citation
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 7 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…The total volume of esmolol required to induce and maintain cardiac arrest is quite low (the addition of a suitable volume of esmolol to oxygenated blood to make up a 1 mmol/L concentration) relative to potassium cardioplegia, for which volumes in excess of 1000 mL are required. Consequently, additional hemodilution during cardiopulmonary bypass should be avoided with esmolol arrest, in contrast to warm continuous-infusion of blood cardioplegia or the cardiac surgical condition induced with esmolol added to blood for continuous infusion, [14][15][16] multidose intermittent esmolol infusion would provide a still and blood-free operating field during warm (normothermic) heart surgery. This technique of multidose esmolol infusion can be used for coronary artery bypass surgery, or any other type of cardiac surgery.…”
Section: Limitations Of This Studymentioning
“…High doses of esmolol were intravenously infused during continuous perfusion of the coronary arteries with normothermic blood to suppress cardiac inotropy and chronotropy, such that the heart rate was slowed sufficiently (without inducing cardiac arrest) to perform the operation. Since then, experimental and clinical studies [15][16][17] have shown that the induction by high-dose esmolol of adequate cardiac surgical conditions has provided myocardial preservation equivalent to or better than cold crystalloid or blood cardioplegia. With this technique, however, which consists of continuous coronary infusion of blood containing esmolol, the surgeon is not provided with a still and blood-free operating field.…”
mentioning
“…O esmolol tem sido usado durante ressecção de feocromocitoma em associação com alfa-bloqueadores 26,27 , no manuseio da hipertensão provocada por tireotoxicose 28 e na toxicidade cardiovascular provocada pela adrenalina ou cocaí-na. Pode ser utilizado ainda como alternativa à cardioplegia em cirurgia coronariana 29 , na hipotensão controlada 30 , como adjuvante na eletroconvulsoterapia 31 e na broncoscopia rígida, e no controle de taquidisritmias e de hipertensões arterial e intra-ocular, entre outras 6,10,13,32 .…”
Section: Principais Bloqueadores Beta-adrenérgicos Utilizados Em Anesunclassified
“…Esmolol has been used during pheochromocytoma resection in association with alpha-blockers 26,27 , to treat thyrotoxicosis-induced hypertension 28 and cardiovascular toxicity caused by epinephrine or cocaine. It can also be used as an alternative to cardioplegia in coronary surgery 29 , in controlled hypotension 30 , as an adjuvant for electroconvulsive therapy 31 and rigid bronchoscopy, and in controlling tachiarhythmias and arterial and intra-ocular hypertension, among others 6,10,13,32 .…”
Section: Esmololmentioning
“…This short half-life of esmolol led Sweeney and Frazier 14 to use high-dose esmolol infusion in hearts of patients with compromised left ventricular (LV) function who were supported by an LV assist device to suppress cardiac inotropy and chronotropy during myocardial revascularization. Subsequently, experimental 15,16 and clinical [17][18][19][20] studies have shown that esmolol can be used to obtain minimal myocardial contraction during cardiac operations while maintaining continuous normothermic coronary perfusion to avoid ischemia. With this technique, myocardial protection was equivalent to or better than that obtained with cold crystalloid or blood cardioplegia.…”
mentioning