2018
DOI: 10.1155/2018/2845176
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Abstract: Background and Purpose There is an increasing interest in the effect of nonpharmacological interventions on the course of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The objective of the present study is to determine the benefits of a structured, multidomain, mostly computer-based, cognitive training (MCT) οn the cognitive performance of patients with early-stage AD. Method Fifty patients with early-stage AD participated in the study. Patients were randomly allocated either to the training program group (n = 25) o… Show more

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Cited by 34 publications
(27 citation statements)
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References 41 publications
(49 reference statements)
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“…Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease is clinically important in terms of early cognitive intervention 14,15,16 as well as future development of disease-modifying therapy, 17 and neuroimaging plays key roles in ensuring accurate and early diagnosis, in revealing the underlying pathophysiology, and in monitoring the disease. Thus far, the use of NODDI in Alzheimer's disease has focused on young-onset Alzheimer's disease (Table 1).…”
Section: Alzheimer's Diseasementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease is clinically important in terms of early cognitive intervention 14,15,16 as well as future development of disease-modifying therapy, 17 and neuroimaging plays key roles in ensuring accurate and early diagnosis, in revealing the underlying pathophysiology, and in monitoring the disease. Thus far, the use of NODDI in Alzheimer's disease has focused on young-onset Alzheimer's disease (Table 1).…”
Section: Alzheimer's Diseasementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite the inconsistent results reported in the literature, training-related changes in cognition in older adults with cognitive disorders have been repeatedly found [9,10]. Neuropsychological test score improvements after traditional pen-and-paper or computerized cognitive training have been found in measures of global composite cognition [40][41][42], verbal memory [11,40,43,44], verbal letter uency [40,41], verbal uency, [45,46], and visuospatial function in the clock-drawing test [40,47]. It has also been reported that VR cognitive training was effective in improving frontal executive function in those with MCI [48], as well as attention and visual memory in older adults [49,50].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Previous studies showed that repeated memory-focused training might have enhanced the processing speed of memory retrieval and e ciency of working memory, leading them to assume that frontal executive function was the main recipient of the transfer effects [73,74]. Although recent studies have applied cognitive training with novel computerized tools, with involvement of multiple cognitive domains, existing programs have only applied cognitive training in a 2D environment with an emphasis on language abilities [9,47,73,75]. Since frontal executive function plays a major role in all cognitive domains and higher-order cognitive controls [76], the improved performance on the RCFT copy task may be supported by increased FC in the frontal-occipital network.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There are other multidomain interventional studies in individuals with cognitive impairment or AD that have been completed (Nousia et al, 2018;Rolland, Barreto, Maltais, Guyonnet, Cantet, Andrieu, & Vellas, 2019;Vellas et al, 2014)…”
Section: Tr Ans L Ating Epidemiolog Ic Al Obs Ervati On S Into P Otmentioning
confidence: 99%