1990
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.126.6.751
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Bacterial transference during electrodesiccation and electrocoagulation

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Cited by 10 publications
(7 citation statements)
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“…Additionally, the remaining necrotic burnt tissue that can usually be found on the tip during the surgery, may lead to a reduced heat transfer and the necrotic tissue may become a reservoir for contamination. Prior publications, mainly in the dermatology literature, have investigated contamination of electrosurgical devices [28,31,32]. In 1987, Sebben noted that there is a potential risk of patient contamination from electrosurgical treatment electrodes [28].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Additionally, the remaining necrotic burnt tissue that can usually be found on the tip during the surgery, may lead to a reduced heat transfer and the necrotic tissue may become a reservoir for contamination. Prior publications, mainly in the dermatology literature, have investigated contamination of electrosurgical devices [28,31,32]. In 1987, Sebben noted that there is a potential risk of patient contamination from electrosurgical treatment electrodes [28].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Bennett and Kraffert studied bacterial transference in electrosurgical devices and concluded that Staphylococcus aureus transference could occur from inoculated tissue to sterile electrode tips, inoculated electrode tips to sterile tissue, or one patient to another. The transference is much more likely during electrodesiccation than electrocoagulation [31]. Sherertz et al [32] demonstrated that hepatitis B virus could be spread by reusable needle electrodes for electrodesiccation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A smoke evacuator, facial masks, and protective eyewear should be used whenever treatment involves HPVrelated lesions or creates a smoke plume. [27][28][29] Eye injury…”
Section: Infection Transmissionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The most important of these is the potential spread of infection via electrosurgery. Publications by E. F. Sherertz, 42 B. J. Berberian, 43 G. B. Colver, 44 W. S. Sawchuk, 45 and R. G. Bennett 46 have provided evidence for potential viral and bacterial transmission during electrosurgery and have offered solutions including strict electrode sterilization, and careful and close smoke plume evacuation. In the past there has been significant concern about using electrosurgery in the presence of cardiac pacemakers, as was expressed by E. A. Krull.…”
Section: Hazards Of Electrosurgerymentioning
confidence: 99%