2010
DOI: 10.1590/s1517-83822010000200023
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Abstract: The bacterial communities in floodwater, from a rice-planted and an unplanted field were characterized at the beginning (flooding stage) and at the end (harvest stage) of the rice cropping cycle. Most probable number estimations and plate counts of aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria and of several metabolic bacterial groups (methanogens, sulfate-reducers, anaerobic sulfur and nonsulfur phototrophs, denitrifiers and ammonifiers) were similar in rice and unplanted floodwater at both sampling times. The… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…The NPK + Urea amended pots showed also the highest content of total Fe in roots at harvest followed by NPK + Urea + Ca + Zn + Mg and the control pots, respectively, for the two rice varieties. Therefore, NPK + Urea and NPK + Urea + Ca + Zn + Mg applications seem to promote also the capacity of BOUAKE-189 and ROK-5 rice varieties to survive into an iron toxicity condition by oxidizing Fe II into their Fe 3+ forms at the root surface (Fe-excluding power) [58] [59].…”
Section: Ferrous Iron Content (µG/g Dry Soil)mentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The NPK + Urea amended pots showed also the highest content of total Fe in roots at harvest followed by NPK + Urea + Ca + Zn + Mg and the control pots, respectively, for the two rice varieties. Therefore, NPK + Urea and NPK + Urea + Ca + Zn + Mg applications seem to promote also the capacity of BOUAKE-189 and ROK-5 rice varieties to survive into an iron toxicity condition by oxidizing Fe II into their Fe 3+ forms at the root surface (Fe-excluding power) [58] [59].…”
Section: Ferrous Iron Content (µG/g Dry Soil)mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These results can be explained by the physiological mechanisms of iron (II) avoidance and/or tolerance of rice plants in order to survive under Fe-toxic condition [60] [61]. Therefore, ROK-5 rice variety can survive to iron toxicity by oxidation of ferrous iron at the root surface (Fe-oxidizing power) [52], exclusion of Fe at the root surface (Fe-excluding power), retention of Fe in the root tissue (Fe-retaining power) [58] [59] or by leaf tissue tolerance to excess amounts of Fe [57].…”
Section: Ferrous Iron Content (µG/g Dry Soil)mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These contrasted results could be partially explained by the MPN method used. Indeed, the analysis of bacterial communities by culturing methods, although valuable to characterize metabolic activities of their members, allows the characterization of only 1% to 3% of the microscopically-detectable cells in soils [39] [40]. Thus, molecular methods could be an indispensable tool to provide a more comprehensive description of the SRB community evolution in relation to drainage [3] [5] [40] [41].…”
Section: Impact Of Drainage On Srb Populations' Development and Activitymentioning
confidence: 99%