2011
DOI: 10.4103/0973-1075.92341
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Abstract: Context:Studies have documented that nurses and other health care professionals are inadequately prepared to care for patients in chronic pain. Several reasons have been identified including inadequacies in nursing education, absence of curriculum content related to pain management, and attitudes and beliefs related to chronic pain.Aims:The objective of this paper was to assess the chronic pain-related attitudes and beliefs among nursing professionals in order to evaluate the biomedical and behavioral dimensio… Show more

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Cited by 11 publications
(6 citation statements)
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References 37 publications
(40 reference statements)
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“…Four of the studies discussed student attitudes, knowledge, and experiences, and only one had a specific focus on prelicensure curricula (Doorenbos et al, 2013). Of note, a greater number of international studies have examined student knowledge and attitudes related to pain (Al Khalaileh & Al Qadire, 2013; Chiu, Trinca, Lim, & Tuazon, 2003; Prem et al, 2011; Rahimi-Madiseh, Tavakol, & Dennick, 2010); however, similar to the U.S. review, few have examined the quantity or nature of pain content within the nursing curricula. Only two international studies—one from Canada (Watt-Watson et al, 2009) and one from the United Kingdom (Briggs et al, 2011)—surveyed prelicensure pain curricula in health sciences students.…”
Section: Current Status Of Pain Management Inclusion In Prelicensure mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Four of the studies discussed student attitudes, knowledge, and experiences, and only one had a specific focus on prelicensure curricula (Doorenbos et al, 2013). Of note, a greater number of international studies have examined student knowledge and attitudes related to pain (Al Khalaileh & Al Qadire, 2013; Chiu, Trinca, Lim, & Tuazon, 2003; Prem et al, 2011; Rahimi-Madiseh, Tavakol, & Dennick, 2010); however, similar to the U.S. review, few have examined the quantity or nature of pain content within the nursing curricula. Only two international studies—one from Canada (Watt-Watson et al, 2009) and one from the United Kingdom (Briggs et al, 2011)—surveyed prelicensure pain curricula in health sciences students.…”
Section: Current Status Of Pain Management Inclusion In Prelicensure mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus we had a final list of 90 articles for our analysis. [1112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263646566676869707172737475767778798081828384858687888990919293949596979899100]…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Another influencing factor was the model of care and it was indeed surprising to note that articles along either biological or psychosocial model scored a higher level than biopsychosocial model. This could be explained in terms of relatively recent development of concept of behavioral model of chronic pain (Prem et al ., 2012),[ 21 ] which the authors and experts had emphasized in their narrative reviews and editorials, and the trend is likely to be reversed with more randomized controlled trials along the biopsychosocial model in the near future.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Indeed, many patients as well as clinicians commonly use the biomedical model of pain as a belief that assumes that the presence and extent of a pain report must have an isomorphic relationship with structural damage (Buitenhuis et al 2008;Prem et al 2011). As a consequence, it is common for patients to question the validity of non-physical, psychological approaches to treat their pain.…”
Section: Biopsychosocial Model Of Painmentioning
confidence: 99%