1962
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1962.tb00099.x
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Abstract: SUMMARY The concentrations of 27 trace elements were determined in four meats: beef, pork, ham, and chicken. Because the concentrations of most of these elements were expected to be very small, the extremely sensitive method of neutron activation analysis was used in this study. Qualitative analyses were performed for 8 of the elements, and the concentrations of 19 elements were determined quantitatively. The quantitatively measured concentrations varied from ∼0.1% for phosphorus to ∼10−5 ppm for cerium. Most … Show more

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Cited by 21 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 10 publications
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“…breeding conditions, rearing areas, animal age, geocomposition of soil and vicinity to contaminated sites), as well as sampling year. Koch and Roesmer (1962) measured Pd by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in different meat samples; mean concentrations per kg (wet weight) were as follows (in ng kg À1 ): chicken, 600; beef, 700; pork, 500. The highest concentration of 2000 ng kg À1 was detected in ham.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…breeding conditions, rearing areas, animal age, geocomposition of soil and vicinity to contaminated sites), as well as sampling year. Koch and Roesmer (1962) measured Pd by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in different meat samples; mean concentrations per kg (wet weight) were as follows (in ng kg À1 ): chicken, 600; beef, 700; pork, 500. The highest concentration of 2000 ng kg À1 was detected in ham.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…On the other hand, only a very few studies have dealt, so far, with the degree to which Pt and Pd compounds can enter the food chain via accumulation or biotransformation in agricultural and zootechnical products (Koch and Roesmer 1962;Vaughan and Florence 1992;Zhou and Liu 1997;Ysart et al 1999;Frazzoli et al 2006).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although the values for mineral content of meat remain under the limits determined by other authors [4,9,10,[18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28], the increase of iron, copper, tin and zinc contents is rather sharp and they may even exceed the higher legal limits in a longer than two years' time. Therefore, it would be better if the canned meat was consumed within 2 yc;ir\' time.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…nanogram range (1,2). The reason for this situation is twofold-namely, the extremely low concentration of these elements in tissues is below the detection limit of the analytical techniques routinely employed for tissue analysis; and the lack of scientific interest in these elements because of their very limited distribution in the environment and the attendant low environmental exposure probability.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%