2016
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1571812
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Abstract: Anomalous connection of the coronary artery to the pulmonary artery (ACAPA) has a low incidence rate in older children and adults. The aim of this article was to evaluate the outcome of treating ACAPA with aortic implantation in older children and adults. We included 21 patients (9 children and 12 adults) with ACAPA in our hospital between January 1991 and January 2015. Among these patients, 19 had anomalous connection of the left coronary artery to the pulmonary artery, 2 had anomalous connection of the right… Show more

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Cited by 1 publication
(30 citation statements)
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“…Coronary steal from low pulmonary pressures causing right coronary artery (RCA) retrograde flow is the hallmark of ARCAPA. 5 The result is poor RCA territory perfusion with the development of extensive collateral networks that steal blood from the left coronary artery (LCA). The LCA dilates to accommodate the increased flow required by the collateralized network.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Coronary steal from low pulmonary pressures causing right coronary artery (RCA) retrograde flow is the hallmark of ARCAPA. 5 The result is poor RCA territory perfusion with the development of extensive collateral networks that steal blood from the left coronary artery (LCA). The LCA dilates to accommodate the increased flow required by the collateralized network.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Multiple techniques can be used for implanting the RCA but not all address the difficulties encountered with ARCAPA. 5,6 Typically, the RCA is tortuous and thin-walled, which predisposes the RCA to kinking during transfer to the aorta. We have found that the use of a modified trapdoor technique in coronary transfer minimizes these concerns by creating more favorable RCA geometry following reimplantation.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%