2018
DOI: 10.1590/rbz4720160290
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Antioxidant effect of the guava byproduct in the diet of broilers in the starter phase

Abstract: This work aimed to investigate the antioxidant capacity of the guava agroindustrial waste as a functional additive in broiler feed to improve the performance and meat quality of boilers. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design, consisting of four treatments and six replicates with 12 birds. Treatments included different levels of guava byproduct in the feed: 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5%. We evaluated the performance of broilers at 7 and 21 days old. At 21 days old, two birds from each experimen… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(11 citation statements)
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“…In this study, the use of guava extracts up to 9 g kg -1 was not effective to maintain the quality of egg stored until 27 days. It was expected that the antioxidant propriety of guava would improve the egg's characteristics and became an alternative to synthetic antioxidants, since the guava results in greater antioxidant status in broiler meat (Oliveira et al, 2018). Some studies should be carried out to clarify if the guava can be transferred into de the egg and present the antioxidant effects.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In this study, the use of guava extracts up to 9 g kg -1 was not effective to maintain the quality of egg stored until 27 days. It was expected that the antioxidant propriety of guava would improve the egg's characteristics and became an alternative to synthetic antioxidants, since the guava results in greater antioxidant status in broiler meat (Oliveira et al, 2018). Some studies should be carried out to clarify if the guava can be transferred into de the egg and present the antioxidant effects.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The guava extract is a sub product of industry, rich in phenolic compounds that shows good antioxidant activity (Haida et al, 2015). According to Oliveira et al (2018), guava byproduct can be used as an alternative antioxidant additive in broiler diets in an early stage because it improves thigh meat quality of broilers. Surai et al (2003) studied the canthaxanthin supplementation of the maternal diet on the antioxidant system of the developing chick and concluded that the canthaxanthin was transferred from the egg yolk to the developing embryo.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Guava extract has a high concentration of phenolic compounds, which, according to Oliveira et al (2018), can act as trophic agents in the intestine, increasing the villus:crypt ratio, promoting greater integrity and intestinal health and consequent improvement in performance. According to Furlan et al (2004), trophic agents stimulate the mitotic process in the crypt-villus region, stimulating the development of the mucosa; as a result, the number of cells and villus size increases.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Phenolic compounds can improve the gut morphology of broilers, with positive effects on villus height and crypt depth (Kamboh and Zhu, 2014;Oliveira et al, 2018). Increased villus height is associated with improved digestive and absorptive functions in the intestine, which consequently can improve performance (Viveros et al, 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The composition of guava agroindustrial waste (GAW) contains crude protein (CP; 39.5 g/kg dry matter [DM]), neutral detergent fiber (NDF; 761.8 g/kg DM), acid detergent fiber (ADF; 453.2 g/kg), and ash (10.0 g/kg DM) (Oliveira et al, 2018). Moreover, its lipid fraction is predominantly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, especially linoleic acid (77.35% of all fatty acids) (Uchôa- Thomaz et al, 2014).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%