1984
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.120.6.765
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Antimalarial psychosis revisited

Abstract: Drug-induced psychosis resulted from the administration of quinacrine hydrochloride at a dosage of 100 mg twice daily for the treatment of discoid lupus. After two weeks of drug treatment, the patient exhibited symptoms similar to those seen in the manic phase of bipolar affective disorder. Although the incidence of antimalarial psychosis is unclear and perhaps small, we recommend close observation of patients for behavioral changes suggesting the development of antimalarial psychosis. Astute observation, lead… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
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“…At higher doses symptoms may include restlessness, vertigo, insomnia, nightmares, hyperirritability, psychosis and convulsions. Although toxic psychosis following quinacrine administration has been reported [54-56], large scale studies reveal this to be a rare and quickly reversible event. However it must be noted that a study of over 7,500 US soldiers given quinacrine (100 mg/day) in World War II revealed a 0.4% incidence of toxic psychosis [57].…”
Section: Ophthalmologic and Central Nervous System Toxicitymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…At higher doses symptoms may include restlessness, vertigo, insomnia, nightmares, hyperirritability, psychosis and convulsions. Although toxic psychosis following quinacrine administration has been reported [54-56], large scale studies reveal this to be a rare and quickly reversible event. However it must be noted that a study of over 7,500 US soldiers given quinacrine (100 mg/day) in World War II revealed a 0.4% incidence of toxic psychosis [57].…”
Section: Ophthalmologic and Central Nervous System Toxicitymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…& Sobow T., 2017; Breuer O. & Schultz A., 2018; Chattopadhyay R. et al, 2007; Cooper R.G., 2008; Evans R.L. et al, 1984; Farhangian M.E.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[11][12][13] Also, clinical literature indicates similar toxic psychosis reactions in patients receiving other quinoline drugs (eg, chloroquine, quinacrine). [14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24] Dose considerations are important to estimate mefloquine's safety, and the target blood concentration for therapeutic mefloquine (~13 µM) is much higher than blood concentrations for prophylactic treatments (3-4 µM). CNS effects are prevalent after high doses of mefloquine, but are seen less consistently after prophylaxis.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%