2007
DOI: 10.1080/10915810701490190 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Until recently, the published literature on inhalation studies with laboratory animals and cigarette smoke consisted entirely of negative findings, as far as neoplastic disease is concerned. This paper brings readers up to date, with analyses of recent studies that do indeed appear to report success after so many years of failure. The paper consists of a brief analysis of the literature up until a couple of years ago, giving brief, representative examples of inhalation studies with the five main species of lab… Show more

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“…23 -26 Most studies on the effects of cigarette smoke in adult animals have been performed in rodents. 19 The few studies on the effects of cigarette smoke in adult, non-rodent species were performed either acutely in anaesthetized ewes through a tracheal tube, 27 or chronically in tracheotomized sheep 28,29 and dogs, 19,30 in intact dogs using a mask 31,32 or in baboons taught to inhale through the mouth. 33 Studies in large newborn mammals were also initially performed in lambs as a model of bronchitis, using a tracheostomy tube 29 or an ASM custom-made from a Bird ventilator.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Studies had to be published in the peer-reviewed literature and meet these requirements: overall duration consistent with the duration of carcinogenesis and/or detailed histopathological description. With regard to rodent studies done up to the year 2000 the author concluded that "significant increases in the numbers of malignant tumors of the respiratory tract were not seen in rats, mice, hamsters ….. exposed for long periods of time to very high concentrations of cigarette smoke" (375 (378) exposed male and female F344 rats whole body for 6 hours/day and 5 days/week over near life span (up to 30 months) to 100 or 250 mg TPM/m³ from the plain 1R3 Kentucky reference cigarettes. For female rats the higher concentration was obviously rather close to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD).…”
Section: Brought To You By | Mit Librariesmentioning
“…It was concluded that the multiple effects that were recorded needed to be followed up on in chronic exposure studies. In 1998-2007 COGGINS brought out three papers (373)(374)(375) and a Letter to the Editor (376) to review representative chronic inhalation studies with mainstream cigarette smoke performed with five main species of laboratory animals; the endpoint of concern was neoplastic disease. Studies had to be published in the peer-reviewed literature and meet these requirements: overall duration consistent with the duration of carcinogenesis and/or detailed histopathological description.…”
Section: Brought To You By | Mit Librariesmentioning
“…In the present study, 2R1 cigarettes were used based on the Kentucky University Tobacco criteria (45,46). A device designed to mimic human physiology was used ( Figure 1) and experimental animals were exposed to smoke.…”
Section: Btx and Csmentioning
“…As a consequence, the forced expiratory volume of the lungs is decreased proportionally to the number of cigarettes smoked. Gaworski et al (1997) and Coggins (2007) have studied histopathological changes in rats exposed to high doses of tobacco smoke. The rats had a significant increase of squamous metaplasia, basal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis of the nasal, laryngeal and tracheal epithelium.…”
Section: Histopathological Analysismentioning