2017
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Abstract: Human parechovirus types 1–16 (HPeV1–16) are positive strand RNA viruses in the family Picornaviridae. We investigated a 2015 outbreak of HPeV3 causing illness in infants in Victoria, Australia. Virus genome was extracted from clinical material and isolates and sequenced using a combination of next generation and Sanger sequencing. The HPeV3 outbreak genome was 98.7% similar to the HPeV3 Yamagata 2011 lineage for the region encoding the structural proteins up to nucleotide position 3115, but downstream of that… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(132 citation statements)
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References 91 publications
(132 reference statements)
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“…1 to design a custom Ion AmpliSeq Panel (here referred to as panel 1) for use with Ion Torrent S5 System (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Vic. Australia).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, in contrast to other countries, epidemics in Australia have been larger and associated with more severe disease (and poorer clinical outcomes) 14 , 15 . Recently, whole genome sequencing has shown that the first Australian epidemic was likely caused by a novel recombinant HPeV3 16 …”
Section: Virology and Epidemiologymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While most HPeVs cause mild disease in children between 1 to 5 years of age, HPeV3 infection more often leads to severe illness in infants under 3 months of age 3 5 . HPeV3 is prevalent worldwide and outbreaks have been reported in the Netherlands, Japan and Australia 1 , 6 – 11 . Despite the large clinical impact of these viruses, no vaccines or targeted antiviral therapies are available against HPeVs.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Intratypic recombination among HPeVs more frequently observed (1820) though intertypic recombination was also reported (4, 21). This study reported the first intertypic recombination occurring between HPeV5 and HPeV1 leading to an HPeV5 recombinant, which may highlight the evolutionary dynamics and diversity of HPeVs.…”
Section: Genome Announcementmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The phylogenetic and network analyses from the Geelong group support a temporal evolution from the first Australian recombinant virus sequence from November 2013 to March/April 2014 to the 2015 outbreak. Their data showed that the 2015 outbreak viruses are recombined from the Yamagata 2011 lineage and an as yet unknown virus (Nelson et al, 2017).…”
Section: New and Emerging Viruses In Australasia And Beyondmentioning
confidence: 99%