2015
DOI: 10.1590/1678-476620151054403410 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: ABSTRACT. Mugil liza Valenciennes, 1836 is an economically important food fish and has been recommended for aquaculture in South America. A total of 278 fishes were collected in the spring and summer of 2009 and 2010. These fish were sorted into sample groups according to their size class. We used Bayesian statistics and 95% credible intervals for each parameter tested were calculated. Fish studied harbored a total of 15 different species of parasites. Diversity of parasite species found on Mugil liza was grea… Show more

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“…Species of Floridosentis Ward, 1953 (Acanthocephala) are common parasites of mugilid fishes which live in marine and brackish waters. They are widely distributed in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans (Alarcos and Etchegoin 2010;Rosas-Valdez, Morrone, and García-Varela 2012;Montes and Martorelli 2015) and rarely parasitise other marine fish. In Argentina, the only mullet species with a permanent presence is M. liza (González-Castro, Macchi, and Cousseau 2011), This fish uses estuarine habitats as feeding growth and gonadal maturation sites (González Castro, Abachian, and Perrotta 2009;González Castro 2018).…”
Section: Habitat and Prevalence In The Definitive Hostmentioning
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“…Species of Floridosentis Ward, 1953 (Acanthocephala) are common parasites of mugilid fishes which live in marine and brackish waters. They are widely distributed in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans (Alarcos and Etchegoin 2010;Rosas-Valdez, Morrone, and García-Varela 2012;Montes and Martorelli 2015) and rarely parasitise other marine fish. In Argentina, the only mullet species with a permanent presence is M. liza (González-Castro, Macchi, and Cousseau 2011), This fish uses estuarine habitats as feeding growth and gonadal maturation sites (González Castro, Abachian, and Perrotta 2009;González Castro 2018).…”
Section: Habitat and Prevalence In The Definitive Hostmentioning
“…During our routine investigations on the parasite fauna of fishes from brackish waters of Samborombón Bay, a total of 15 species of parasites were recorded in juvenile lebranche mullets (Montes and Martorelli 2015), but only one species of acanthocephalan worm was found attached in the intestinal wall. It was identified as Floridosentis mugilis (Machado-Filho, 1951).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Its life-cycle includes adult parasites in the intestine of fish-eating birds and mammals and the metacercaria mainly in mullets (Mugil spp.) [14,18,24,[26][27][28][29][30][31]. The life cycle of A. longa is associated with estuaries and coastal lagoons, where the mugilid juveniles become infected [7,17,24,[26][27][28]30].…”
Section: Taxonomy and Life Cyclesmentioning
“…[ 14 , 18 , 24 , 26 – 31 ]. The life cycle of A. longa is associated with estuaries and coastal lagoons, where the mugilid juveniles become infected [ 7 , 17 , 24 , 26 28 , 30 ]. The first intermediate host in Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay is the snail Heleobia australis (d’Orbigny, 1835), in which rediae and parapleurolophocercous cercariae develop [ 7 , 31 ].…”
Section: Taxonomy and Life Cyclesmentioning