2018
DOI: 10.1139/cjz-2017-0249
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Abstract: Crocodilian nests naturally experience high CO2 (hypercarbia), which leads to increased blood Pco2 and reduced blood pH (pHe) in embryos; their response to acid–base challenges is not known. During acute hypercarbia, snapping turtle embryos preferentially regulate tissue pH (pHi) against pHe reductions. This is proposed to be associated with CO2 tolerance in reptilian embryos and is not found in adults. In the present study, we investigated pH regulation in American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis (Daudi… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 34 publications
(36 reference statements)
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“…In addition to sturgeon, preferential pHi regulation has been observed in a number of other fishes including the armored catfish (Pterygoplichthys pardalis), the marbled swamp eel (Synbranchus marmoratus), the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus), and three species of gar (Lepisosteus oculatus, L. osseus, and Atractosteus spatula) (reviewed in Shartau et al, 2020). Preferential pHi regulation was also observed in the late stage developing embryos of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentine; Shartau, Crossley, Kohl, & Brauner, 2016) and American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis; Shartau, Crossley, Kohl, Elsey, & Brauner, 2018). Thus, it has been proposed that preferential pHi regulation may be a general trait in vertebrate embryos prior to the complete development of the extracellular compartments and structures for acid-base regulation (Shartau, Baker, et al, 2016).…”
Section: Coupled Ph Regulation and Preferential Phi Regulationmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…In addition to sturgeon, preferential pHi regulation has been observed in a number of other fishes including the armored catfish (Pterygoplichthys pardalis), the marbled swamp eel (Synbranchus marmoratus), the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus), and three species of gar (Lepisosteus oculatus, L. osseus, and Atractosteus spatula) (reviewed in Shartau et al, 2020). Preferential pHi regulation was also observed in the late stage developing embryos of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentine; Shartau, Crossley, Kohl, & Brauner, 2016) and American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis; Shartau, Crossley, Kohl, Elsey, & Brauner, 2018). Thus, it has been proposed that preferential pHi regulation may be a general trait in vertebrate embryos prior to the complete development of the extracellular compartments and structures for acid-base regulation (Shartau, Baker, et al, 2016).…”
Section: Coupled Ph Regulation and Preferential Phi Regulationmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Recently, preferential pH i regulation has been hypothesized to be an embryonic trait that is either retained or lost in adults (Shartau et al, 2016a), as studies in embryonic reptiles indicate use of preferential pH i regulation during development with a gradual loss to the adults (Shartau et al, 2018(Shartau et al, , 2016b. In embryonic/larval fishes, acid-base regulation is not well studied, but early-stage zebrafish embryos exposed to hypercarbia can rapidly regulate pH i , suggesting that some degree of preferential pH i regulation may occur (Molich and Heisler, 2005).…”
Section: Acid-base Regulation During Hypercarbiamentioning
confidence: 99%