2017
DOI: 10.23855/preslia.2017.001
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Abstract: (2017): Ambrosia artemisiifolia in the Czech Republic: history of invasion, current distribution and prediction of future spread. -Preslia 89: 1-16.We analyse the dynamics of invasion of Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed), one of the most noxious invasive species in Europe with a great impact on human health. We investigate the habitats and factors that shape its current distribution and specify areas in the Czech Republic endangered by the further spread of this species. The analysis is based on a total… Show more

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Cited by 18 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 44 publications
(70 reference statements)
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“…; Brandes and Nitzsche 2006) and, from then, it spread exponentially in several countries (Chauvel et al 2006) and other continents (Montagnani et al 2017). It is expected that the species will expand its range further due to its great dispersal ability and favoured by global warming (Cunze et al 2013, Chapman et al 2014, Leiblein-Wild et al 2016, Skálová et al 2017. Exchanges of contaminated crop seeds still represent an important vector for diffusion (Essl et al 2015) but, despite the absence of specialised dispersal structures, A. artemisiifolia seeds are also spread by water (river flooding; Fumanal et al 2007), animals and human activities (Chauvel et al 2006, Vitalos and Karrer 2009, Von der Lippe et al 2013, Montagnani et al 2017.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…; Brandes and Nitzsche 2006) and, from then, it spread exponentially in several countries (Chauvel et al 2006) and other continents (Montagnani et al 2017). It is expected that the species will expand its range further due to its great dispersal ability and favoured by global warming (Cunze et al 2013, Chapman et al 2014, Leiblein-Wild et al 2016, Skálová et al 2017. Exchanges of contaminated crop seeds still represent an important vector for diffusion (Essl et al 2015) but, despite the absence of specialised dispersal structures, A. artemisiifolia seeds are also spread by water (river flooding; Fumanal et al 2007), animals and human activities (Chauvel et al 2006, Vitalos and Karrer 2009, Von der Lippe et al 2013, Montagnani et al 2017.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ambrosia artemisiifolia has lighter and smaller seeds (Fig. 5), so A. artemisiifolia seeds are easier to spread in habitats with more human activity such as residential area and roadside (Essl et al, 2009;Bullock et al, 2012;Skalova et al, 2017). Easier spread of seeds of A. artemisiifolia may explain larger distribution of the species in the Yili Valley.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The CLC dataset was therefore separated into regions (at NUTS1 and NUTS2 levels) and each region was given its own set of land cover classes following Karrer et al (2015). These regions that, according to current scientific knowledge, might be infested by common ragweed (Table 1) include: the Pannonian Plain (Skjøth et al, 2010), which we have extended to cover the Balkan region and parts of Turkey (Onen et al, 2014); Austria/Switzerland (Karrer et al, 2015); parts of Italy (Bonini et al, 2017;Celesti-Grapow et al, 2009;Gentili et al, 2017); France (Thibaudon et al, 2014); Czech Republic (Skálová et al, 2017); Northern and Southern Europe. Note that we assume that the main infestation of common ragweed in Northern and Southern Europe is in the urban zone (McInnes et al, 2017;Sommer et al, 2015), an assumption supported by the fact that most observations of common ragweed in these areas have been associated with built environments (Sommer et al, 2015).…”
Section: Inventories Of Infested Habitatsmentioning
confidence: 99%