1971
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.104.1.73
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Allergic contact dermatitis from ragweeds (Ambrosia species). The role of sesquiterpene lactones

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Cited by 11 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…Rather than morphological adaptations, chemical protections, such as leaf-coating resins, are important in ragweeds: Ambrosia species characteristically possess glandular trichomes, especially on the lower leaf surfaces but also on stems, thus producing resinous excreta rich in secondary metabolites such as sesquiterpenes and flavonoids (Mitchell et al, 1971;Wollenweber et al 1987;. In general, like many other Asteraceae (Heinrich et al, 1998), Ambrosia species can biosynthesize many types of secondary metabolites (Hodgins et al, 2013;Wan et al, 2002;Wang et al, 2005;Kong, 2010;Sülsen et al, 2008Sülsen et al, , 2013) that contribute to protecting plants from abiotic and biotic perturbations (Table 4) Parts of plants and seeds can be included in the diet of several wild mammals, birds and insects, and due to secondary metabolites ragweed species are unpalatable for cattle that only resort to eating the plants when there is no alternative forage (Marten and Andersen, 1975;Reece et al, 2004;Bullock et al, 2012).…”
Section: Resistancementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Rather than morphological adaptations, chemical protections, such as leaf-coating resins, are important in ragweeds: Ambrosia species characteristically possess glandular trichomes, especially on the lower leaf surfaces but also on stems, thus producing resinous excreta rich in secondary metabolites such as sesquiterpenes and flavonoids (Mitchell et al, 1971;Wollenweber et al 1987;. In general, like many other Asteraceae (Heinrich et al, 1998), Ambrosia species can biosynthesize many types of secondary metabolites (Hodgins et al, 2013;Wan et al, 2002;Wang et al, 2005;Kong, 2010;Sülsen et al, 2008Sülsen et al, , 2013) that contribute to protecting plants from abiotic and biotic perturbations (Table 4) Parts of plants and seeds can be included in the diet of several wild mammals, birds and insects, and due to secondary metabolites ragweed species are unpalatable for cattle that only resort to eating the plants when there is no alternative forage (Marten and Andersen, 1975;Reece et al, 2004;Bullock et al, 2012).…”
Section: Resistancementioning
confidence: 99%
“…All 3 patients with ragweed ( Ambrosia spp.) dermatitis reacted, on patch testing, to Chrysanthemum parthenium (feverfew) and to an unspecified liverwort ( Frullania sp., family Frullaniaceae) . Similarly, positive patch test reactions to feverfew were observed in nearly all patients with contact dermatitis caused by liverworts of the genus Frullania and various sesquiterpene lactone‐containing plants of the families Magnoliaceae, Lauraceae, and Compositae.…”
Section: Tanacetum Parthenium Schbip (Syns Chrysanthemum Partheniummentioning
confidence: 90%
“…In the United States, this is known as "ragweed dermatitis" because it is largely caused by ragweeds, which are species of Ambrosia [159,160] or "weed dermatitis" in regions where other composite weeds predominate [161], such as Ambrosia, Artemisia, Helenium, and Iva [162][163][164][165][166][167][168][169][170][171] species. For example, cases of severe airborne ACD from triangle-leaf bursage (Ambrosia deltoidea) were reported in the USA, with positive reactions to ether extracts of the plant [172].…”
Section: Asteraceae/compositae (Daisy Family)mentioning
confidence: 99%