2019
DOI: 10.1080/1747423x.2020.1719225
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Abstract: We consider trends in the use of modern agricultural inputs of migrant settlers and indigenous populations in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon and the demographic, socioeconomic, and land use-related factors affecting input use. It is widely believed that the different livelihood strategies and therefore different relationships to the land of indigenous populations and migrant settlers result in different uses of chemical inputs in agriculture. We analyze data from two panel surveys, one of migrant settler house… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(56 citation statements)
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References 44 publications
(56 reference statements)
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“…The discriminant analysis showed attributes of similarity (sustainability issues) between migrant settlers and the Shuar, corroborating the results of other researchers, who suggest that the Shuar are increasingly integrating into the market economy, participating in extensive cattle raising and commercial agriculture, and have similarly to migrant settlers (Rubenstein, 2001;Zimmerman et al, 2001;Rudel et al, 2002;Godoy et al, 2005;Gray et al, 2008). Meanwhile, greater divergence is evident among the Waorani and Kichwa in terms of sustainability, probably influenced by the following factors: (1) Indigenous people adopt technologies for labor in traditional production systems (Sellers and Bilsborrow, 2020); (2) Oil activity (Rivera-Parra et al, 2020) has intensified, and this potentially represents a major transformation of their social, economic and environmental context (Codato et al, 2019), and to compound these changes, oil companies may offer access to employment, cash payments or health, and transportation services to indigenous communities in order to facilitate their work and/or comply with legal or internal "corporate social responsibility" mandates (O'Faircheallaigh, 2013;Billo, 2015);…”
Section: Assessment Of Sustainability Dimensionssupporting
confidence: 83%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The discriminant analysis showed attributes of similarity (sustainability issues) between migrant settlers and the Shuar, corroborating the results of other researchers, who suggest that the Shuar are increasingly integrating into the market economy, participating in extensive cattle raising and commercial agriculture, and have similarly to migrant settlers (Rubenstein, 2001;Zimmerman et al, 2001;Rudel et al, 2002;Godoy et al, 2005;Gray et al, 2008). Meanwhile, greater divergence is evident among the Waorani and Kichwa in terms of sustainability, probably influenced by the following factors: (1) Indigenous people adopt technologies for labor in traditional production systems (Sellers and Bilsborrow, 2020); (2) Oil activity (Rivera-Parra et al, 2020) has intensified, and this potentially represents a major transformation of their social, economic and environmental context (Codato et al, 2019), and to compound these changes, oil companies may offer access to employment, cash payments or health, and transportation services to indigenous communities in order to facilitate their work and/or comply with legal or internal "corporate social responsibility" mandates (O'Faircheallaigh, 2013;Billo, 2015);…”
Section: Assessment Of Sustainability Dimensionssupporting
confidence: 83%
“…It is evident that the differences in terms of agricultural sustainability (Figure 2) between indigenous populations and migrant settlers (Figure 3) are narrowing (Rubenstein, 2001;Sellers and Bilsborrow, 2020). The existence of identified synergies and trade-offs (Table 8) provide policymakers with specific information to design sustainable development policies and rescue traditional agricultural systems in the DLZ.…”
Section: Policy Implications To Safeguard Traditional Agricultural Sy...mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The average age of the head of the household in the study area was over 50, a similar value to that of land-owning producers of small livestock species at low altitudes in Napo Province [18]. The adoption of unsustainable productive dynamics similar to those of migrant settlers was observed [38,39], which could be due to the proximity to roads and the market economy [40,41]. However, it is important to consider the results of Torres et al [18], who reported that Kichwa households involved in livestock-based livelihood strategies obtain significantly lower incomes from this activity than migrant settlers.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 54%
“…The growth of tropical forests in highly weathered soils is often supported by the feedback between vegetation and soils, mediated by climatic conditions (Caliman et al, 2020;Haridasan, 2008). The humid forests' warm and wet tropical climate favors litter decomposition and the release of nutrients, which are quickly absorbed by the forest (Luizao et al, 2004;S. Sellers & Bilsborrow, 2019).…”
Section: Nutrient-related Processesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The growth of tropical forests in highly weathered soils is often supported by the feedback between vegetation and soils, mediated by climatic conditions (Caliman et al., 2020; Haridasan, 2008). The humid forests' warm and wet tropical climate favors litter decomposition and the release of nutrients, which are quickly absorbed by the forest (Luizao et al., 2004; S. Sellers & Bilsborrow, 2019). It has been shown that the deposition of nitrogen and phosphorus from litterfall and leaf litter decomposition partially compensates for the low content of these nutrients in soils (Caliman et al., 2020), helping organisms establish even within inhospitable environments (Erwin et al., 2013).…”
Section: Tropical Forests and Supporting Servicesmentioning
confidence: 99%